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Aḥob of Qatar and the Development of the East Syriac Exegetical Tradition
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In The Heirs of Theodore Seth M. Stadel examines Aḥob of Qatar, a late 6th-century East Syriac biblical commentator, and his surviving Old Testament exegetical works. He further investigates what can be deduced of Aḥob’s influence on the later East Syriac exegetical tradition, and he details the originality of Aḥob’s exegesis, especially in comparison with earlier and contemporary Greek and Syriac sources. By presenting the first annotated edition, English translation, and study of Aḥob’s extant Old Testament exegetical works, Stadel is able to show that Aḥob represents a distinct voice within the East Syriac exegetical tradition.
In: The Heirs of Theodore
In: The Heirs of Theodore
In: The Heirs of Theodore
In: The Heirs of Theodore
In: The Heirs of Theodore
In: The Heirs of Theodore
In: The Heirs of Theodore
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Abstract

Aḥob of Qatar is a late 6th-century East Syriac biblical commentator whose cosmology has not previously been studied. Aḥob’s cosmology is preserved in two parts in several late 19th-century Denḥa-Grigor Commentary (first half of the 9th century?) manuscripts: one part is a scholion connected to Psalm 104 and the other part is a diagrammatic illustration (in four related witnesses), which portrays five levels of heaven as envisioned by Aḥob. This paper introduces and presents Aḥob’s cosmology in six parts: 1) an exploration of the authorship of the original version of the diagrammatic illustration, 2) an analyzed study of the rare word ܩܢܘܒܘܪܘܢ, which is used in both Aḥob’s Psalm 104:2–3 scholion and the four witnesses of the diagrammatic illustration, 3) an examination of the extant contents of Aḥob’s cosmology, 4) a discussion of the sources and significance of Aḥob’s cosmology, 5) a presentation of the first annotated edition and English translation of Aḥob’s Psalm 104:2–3 scholion and diagrammatic illustration, and 6) a presentation of the images of the diagrammatic illustration’s four witnesses.

In: Journal of Eastern Christian Studies