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In Violence: Probing the Boundaries around the World the contributors analyse implicitly and explicitly the conceptualisation of violent processes across the world, as well as the circumstances that enable them to exist, and open ways to imagine valuable interventions. This collection of articles presented on the 11th Global Conference in Prague makes clear how fascinating violence is, and how difficult to cope with and to initiate changes. Through explicit thinking, the book opens ways to develop and to plan relevant initiatives and valuable interventions that are culture sensitive.

Abstract

Limited services and limited availability of services are part of the violence that persons with disabilities suffer chronically at the hands of their society.

The Ministry of Justice Commission for Equal Rights of Persons with Disabilities (Israel), in an effort to widen awareness and deepen the implementation of the law, launched a project aimed at improving the availability of services (access for wheel chairs, auditory information for persons with sight difficulties, etc.) by offering community and institutional consultation to citizens and to local authorities.

The heart of the consultation focused on two parallel processes. The first, to help community volunteers with disabilities to develop an active awareness of their rights and the ability to initiate and sustain community organisations, by dealing with the rooted feelings of impotence and introjected oppression. The second, to help officials improve their sensitivity to the needs and requests of the citizens involved, and their readiness to cope with their inherent anxiety, and to build stable group settings where future negotiations can take place, on an equalitarian basis.

Availability of services represents a very deeply rooted contract between individuals, groups, communities and the society at large. Lack of knowledge of their rights, fear to approach ‘authorities’ and to experience once again rejection and humiliation, reinforce social inequality.

Communities that feel themselves outside the prevalent social contract (and are unaware that they sustain an alternative detrimental contract) assume that struggle for their rights imply explosive violence, or total submission, or implementation of bribe tactics.

Detrimental contracts reflect the balance of interests and power within a given society and as such enable the long run oppressive norms to continue to prevail.

Wider implications of the project may be the training of citizens and especially citizens with handicaps.

In: Violence: Probing the Boundaries around the World
In: Violence: Probing the Boundaries around the World
In: Violence: Probing the Boundaries around the World

Abstract

Limited services and limited availability of services are part of the violence that persons with disabilities suffer chronically at the hands of their society.

The Ministry of Justice Commission for Equal Rights of Persons with Disabilities (Israel), in an effort to widen awareness and deepen the implementation of the law, launched a project aimed at improving the availability of services (access for wheel chairs, auditory information for persons with sight difficulties, etc.) by offering community and institutional consultation to citizens and to local authorities.

The heart of the consultation focused on two parallel processes. The first, to help community volunteers with disabilities to develop an active awareness of their rights and the ability to initiate and sustain community organisations, by dealing with the rooted feelings of impotence and introjected oppression. The second, to help officials improve their sensitivity to the needs and requests of the citizens involved, and their readiness to cope with their inherent anxiety, and to build stable group settings where future negotiations can take place, on an equalitarian basis.

Availability of services represents a very deeply rooted contract between individuals, groups, communities and the society at large. Lack of knowledge of their rights, fear to approach ‘authorities’ and to experience once again rejection and humiliation, reinforce social inequality.

Communities that feel themselves outside the prevalent social contract (and are unaware that they sustain an alternative detrimental contract) assume that struggle for their rights imply explosive violence, or total submission, or implementation of bribe tactics.

Detrimental contracts reflect the balance of interests and power within a given society and as such enable the long run oppressive norms to continue to prevail.

Wider implications of the project may be the training of citizens and especially citizens with handicaps.

In: Violence: Probing the Boundaries around the World
In: Violence: Probing the Boundaries around the World
In: Violence: Probing the Boundaries around the World
In: Violence: Probing the Boundaries around the World