Author: Simon
Editor: Simon
Eighteen studies, many based on archival evidence or new methodologies, some proceeding from novel angles, explore the history and culture of Iberia, Italy, and the Mediterranean World in the Middle Ages.
The studies were originally presented at the 27th International Congress of Medieval Studies at Kalamazoo in 1992, and have been collected in honor of Robert I. Burns, S.J., the distinguished medievalist and historian of Mediterranean Spain. Most of the studies mirror the honoree's scholarly interests: Muslim-Christian-Jewish relations in medieval Iberia, the economy and society of the Mediterranean World, religious polemic and ecclesiastical history, and medieval personalities and institutions.
Ten of the studies concern aspects of cultural symbiosis or inter-religious relations in a pluri-ethnic society; and at least an equal number relate to the literary and social history of the Catalan-speaking lands of Mediterranean Spain.
In: Review of Central and East European Law
In: Review of Central and East European Law
The African Journal of Legal Studies (AJLS) is a peer-reviewed and interdisciplinary academic journal focusing on human rights and rule of law issues in Africa as analyzed by lawyers, economists, political scientists and others drawn from throughout the continent and the world. The journal, which was established by the Africa Law Institute and is now co-published in collaboration with Brill | Nijhoff, aims to serve as the leading forum for the thoughtful and scholarly engagement of a broad range of complex issues at the intersection of law, public policy and social change in Africa.

AJLS places emphasis on presenting a diversity of perspectives on fundamental, long-term, systemic problems of human rights and governance, as well as emerging issues, and possible solutions to them. Towards this end, AJLS encourages critical reflections that are based on empirical observations and experience as well as theoretical and multi-disciplinary approaches.

It is hoped that articles appearing in the journal will influence public policy in Africa by providing original, useful and timely critiques of legislation, judicial decisions, law reform and other domestic and foreign policy measures that impact on the daily lives of ordinary Africans. In addition to articles, the journal welcomes reports on recent human rights and governance-related conferences, workshops and seminars as well as books for review and lists of recent publications.

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Editor-in-Chief: William B. Simons
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Language Dynamics and Change (LDC) is an international peer-reviewed journal that covers both new and traditional aspects of the study of language change. Work on all aspects of historical and comparative linguistics and any language or language family is welcomed, as long as it bears on topics that are also of theoretical interest. A particular focus is on new developments in the field arising from the accumulation of extensive databases of linguistic variation and typological distributions, parallel texts, and comparative lexicons, which allow for the application of new types of quantitative approaches to diachronic linguistics. Moreover, the journal will serve as an outlet for increasingly important interdisciplinary work on such topics as the evolution of language, archaeology and linguistics, human genetic and linguistic prehistory, and the computational modeling of language dynamics.

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This innovative series seeks monographs and essay collections that investigate how notions of space, geography, and mapping shaped medieval and early modern cultures. While the history of cartography has traditionally focused on internal developments in European mapping conventions and technologies, pre-modern scribes, illuminators, and printers of maps tended to work in multiple genres. Spatial thinking informed and was informed by multiple epistemologies and perceptions of the order of nature. Maps, Spaces, Cultures therefore integrates the study of cartography and geography within cultural history. It puts genres that reflected and constituted spatial thinking into dialogue with the cultures that produced and consumed them, as well as with those they represented.

The editors welcome submissions from scholars of the histories of art, material culture, colonialism, exploration, ethnography (including that of peoples described as monsters), encounters, literature, philosophy, religion, science and knowledge, as well as of the history of cartography and related disciplines. They encourage interdisciplinary submissions that cross traditional historical, geographical, or methodological boundaries, that include works from outside Western Europe and outside the Christian tradition, and that develop new analytical approaches to pre-modern spatial thinking, cartography, and the geographical imagination.