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In: The World of Science Education
In: The World of Science Education
Authors: Faisal and Sonya N. Martin

The purpose of this paper is to describe pre- and in-service science teacher education and science education research in Indonesia in an effort to better inform the international science education community about historical developments and present challenges. We begin by providing an historical overview of the general education system to provide readers with context needed to understand current reform initiatives. Next we describe the current-day process for preparing and certifying science teachers and we describe some of the challenges facing teachers, students, and researchers in Indonesia’s science education context today. We follow this discussion with an introduction to some existing professional organizations for teachers and researchers in Indonesia that are working to develop important channels for disseminating current research on teacher practice, curriculum innovation, and student learning that have the potential to positively influence on teaching and learning in the future. We conclude by highlighting some areas that would benefit from additional research and by inviting more international collaborative research initiatives with colleagues in the Asia-Pacific region and beyond.

Open Access
In: Asia-Pacific Science Education

Abstract

We offer socio-historical context for understanding current challenges for implementing inclusive education for students with special education needs (SEN) in the Korean education system. We present current barriers to SEN students’ learning, including limited access to physical spaces, material resources that can accommodate impairments, and teachers who are qualified in special education and content areas. These factors, as well as negative attitudes towards people with disabilities in Korean society, prevent SEN learners from being physically and academically integrated into regular education settings. To address these challenges, we describe a course designed to engage pre-service secondary science teachers in experiential learning with SEN students during authentic science teaching activities. This course supports teachers to confront unexamined biases about people with disabilities and inclusive education and to consider how teachers’ beliefs shape their perceptions about SEN learners and their attitudes about the value of science education for students with disabilities. Using autobiographical writing and dialogues in small-group and whole-class discussion to promote reflection and to generate intention for future action, we demonstrate how experiential learning courses can support teachers to develop more positive attitudes towards inclusive education and SEN learners. We discuss limitations and the need for research to improve education for diverse learners in science.

In: Critical Issues and Bold Visions for Science Education
In: Research Collaboration

Abstract

We offer socio-historical context for understanding current challenges for implementing inclusive education for students with special education needs (SEN) in the Korean education system. We present current barriers to SEN students’ learning, including limited access to physical spaces, material resources that can accommodate impairments, and teachers who are qualified in special education and content areas. These factors, as well as negative attitudes towards people with disabilities in Korean society, prevent SEN learners from being physically and academically integrated into regular education settings. To address these challenges, we describe a course designed to engage pre-service secondary science teachers in experiential learning with SEN students during authentic science teaching activities. This course supports teachers to confront unexamined biases about people with disabilities and inclusive education and to consider how teachers’ beliefs shape their perceptions about SEN learners and their attitudes about the value of science education for students with disabilities. Using autobiographical writing and dialogues in small-group and whole-class discussion to promote reflection and to generate intention for future action, we demonstrate how experiential learning courses can support teachers to develop more positive attitudes towards inclusive education and SEN learners. We discuss limitations and the need for research to improve education for diverse learners in science.

In: Critical Issues and Bold Visions for Science Education
In: Re-visioning Science Education from Feminist Perspectives