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The nonreligious youths found at Camp Quest Montana, an explicitly nonreligious summer camp for children and parents of all ages, use a variety of conceptions about religion to form and maintain their nonreligious identity. These conceptions, which were remarkably similar between camp attendees, reveal points of tension between themselves and religious sentiment in the United States. These nonreligious youths assume religious people to be against same-sex marriage and somewhat hostile to the lgbt community in general, more open to the idea of young earth creationism, and less likely to question these beliefs. Utilising ethnographic techniques to examine how youths at Camp Quest Montana frame their nonreligious identity and the expression of that identity as a part of a reaction to religion, as they perceive it, we can gain insight into the creation and maintenance of a nonreligious identity.

In: Youth, Religion, and Identity in a Globalizing Context
In: The Atheist Bus Campaign
In: The Atheist Bus Campaign
In: The Atheist Bus Campaign
In: The Atheist Bus Campaign
In: Youth, Religion, and Identity in a Globalizing Context
In: Youth, Religion, and Identity in a Globalizing Context
In: Youth, Religion, and Identity in a Globalizing Context
International Perspectives
Youth, Religion, and Identity in a Globalizing Context: International Perspectives investigates the ways that young people navigate the intersections of religion and identity. As part of the Youth in a Globalizing World series, this book provides a broad discussion on the various social, cultural, and political forces affecting youth and their identities from an international comparative perspective. Contributors to this volume situate the experiences of young people in Canada, the United States, Germany, and Australia within a globalized context. This volume explores the different experiences of youth, the impact of community and processes of recognition, and the reality of ambivalence as agency.