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Over the past few years, Johannine studies has experienced a resurgence of interest. Previous views have been rigorously re-examined and new theories proposed, including theories on the origins of John’s Gospel, its relationship to the Synoptic Gospels, its historiography, and many other topics. It is therefore time to publish a series devoted to the Johannine writings and their many attendant research questions.

Brill’s new Johannine Studies series will concentrate upon topics of special relevance for Johannine research, especially where recent work is re-conceptualizing old topics or introducing new ones. The number of scholars devoting their efforts to such areas continues to grow.

The new series will begin with an annotated bibliography of the Johannine writings, as a means of chronicling the state of play in Johannine research, and will continue with individual volumes of edited essays on assigned topics, with the possibility of continuance with a further series of five volumes.

Papers will be solicited from a wide range of scholars, including Johannine scholars in particular but also those who are interested in Johannine topics and their intersection with other areas of New Testament studies.

The series has published an average of 0,5 volumes per year since 2013.
This handbook provides a substantial theoretical and practical guide to the multi-faceted discipline of exegesis of the New Testament.
After an introduction to exegesis and a bibliographic essay on the basic tools, the volume has two major parts. The first focuses on method, and includes essays on the major approaches to exegesis, including textual criticism, language, genre and backgrounds. The second part applies exegetical method to the various literary units of the New Testament.
Most exegetical handbooks are either too short and brief, thereby failing to cover the requisite current topics in sufficient depth, or too technically difficult, failing to provide a useful methodology. This coordinated volume offers succinct and well-informed essays, with plenty of bibliography, written by experts in their respective fields. The handbook will serve well as a textbook, as well as a reference book to the major tools and topics in the area.

This publication has also been published in paperback, please click here for details.
The Pauline letters continue to provoke scholarly discussion. This volume includes papers that raise a variety of questions regarding the canon of the Pauline writings. Some of the essays are more narrowly focused in their intent, sometimes concentrating upon a single dimension related to the Pauline canon, and sometimes upon even a single letter. Others of the essays are more broadly conceived and deal with how one assesses or accounts for the process that resulted in the letters as a collection, rather than analyzing individual letters. There are also mediating positions that attempt to overcome the disjunction between authenticity and inauthenticity by exploring the complex notion of interpolation.
Does Paul have a theology? If so, what is it, or rather, what is it on various topics that he and the early Church confronted? This volume moves beyond the traditional discussion of whether Paul had a center to his theology to raise questions regarding his perspective on a number of important theological issues. These issues include his gentile mission, the concepts of faith, grace, and the law, reconciliation, the temple, eschatology, miracles, gender, and Paul's trinitarian tendencies. This collection of essays addresses topics of current interest in the study of Paul's theology—not to arrive at the center of his thought, but to understand what factors helped to center his thinking on a variety of important theological concerns.
This volume is concerned with Paul's world. The major question to ask is—what is that world of Paul? In determinable ways, Paul's world is everything in the world in which Paul lived and acted, and hence virtually everything that Paul did. In other words, Paul's world can be defined macrocosmically and microcosmically. As the term is defined in the various essays in this volume, Paul's world includes the surrounding environment in which Paul functioned, including its various religious, social, cultural, literary, rhetorical, linguistic and related phenomena. This volume treats some of the most important and germane factors that went into making up the world in which Paul lived, and that consequently defined who he was and became.
What does it mean to study Paul the Apostle as Jew, Greek, and Roman? The framing of the question exposes the fact that the distinctions themselves involve a complex of ethnic, social, and cultural designations. Paul is both a complicated individual of the ancient world, because he combines in his one personage features of life in each of these cultural-ethnic (and even religious) areas of the ancient world, and one of many people of that world who evidenced such complexity. This volume, Paul: Jew, Greek, and Roman, explores a number of the important and diverse cultural, ethnic, and religious dimensions of the multi-faceted background of Paul the Apostle. Some of the treatments are focused and specific, while others range over the broad issues that go to making up the world of the Apostle.
Authors: Weima and Stanley E. Porter
This bibliography lists some 1300 works germane for the interpretation of 1 and 2 Thessalonians. It includes all relevant works written in the 20th century as well as a sizeable number of important sources from the 19th century.
Virtually all the works listed are annotated, except for commentaries and dictionary articles. These annotations do not merely describe the content of each source but attempt to summarize its central thesis or argument.
The works listed are classified and cross-indexed in such a way that the user is able to track down easily the relevant sources on any given topic or passage in the Thessalonian letters.
This detailed reference work provides a comprehensive and wide-ranging introduction to classical rhetoric as it was practised in the hellenistic period (330 B.C.-A.D.400).
In three sections, it provides a thorough description and analysis of the standard categories of thought, terminology, and theoretical and historical developments of classical rhetoric, as well as providing useful bibliographies. The three sections of essays define the major categories of rhetoric, analyze rhetorical practice according to genre of writing, and treat individual writers in the rhetorical tradition. 27 international scholars from a wide range of backgrounds have contributed to this high-quality publication, which provides an state-of-the-art overview of the current research and will from the basis of future explorations.
Students of the rhetoric of the New Testament, the hellenistic period, the classical period and the patristic era will all find this volume useful and insightful, as will those with general interests in these subjects.

This publication has also been published in paperback, please click here for details.
A Handbook to the Exegesis of the New Testament is a substantial theoretical and practical guide to the multifaceted discipline of New Testament exegesis. This volume covers current topics in New Testament exegesis in sufficient depth to provide a useful methodological basis. The introduction includes an analysis of the various definitions of exegesis, a term notoriously difficult to define, and a bibliographic essay covering the basic tools of exegesis. A section on method includes detailed discussions of the different models used in the major approaches to exegesis: textual criticism; linguistic analysis; genre criticism; source, form, and redaction criticism; discourse analysis; rhetorical and narratological criticism; literary criticism; and canonical criticism. Also included are models based on analysis of the backgrounds of the New Testament in Hellenistic philosophy, ancient Judaism, the Roman Empire, and the works of second-century authors. In a section on application, exegetical methods are applied to the various literary units of the New Testament. This handbook will serve well as both a textbook and a reference book for the major tools and topics in the area of New Testament exegesis.

This publication has also been published in hardback, please click here for details.
This detailed reference work provides a comprehensive and wide-ranging introduction to classical rhetoric as it was practised in the hellenistic period (330 B.C.-A.D.400).
In three sections, it provides a thorough description and analysis of the standard categories of thought, terminology, and theoretical and historical developments of classical rhetoric, as well as providing useful bibliographies. The three sections of essays define the major categories of rhetoric, analyze rhetorical practice according to genre of writing, and treat individual writers in the rhetorical tradition. 27 international scholars from a wide range of backgrounds have contributed to this high-quality publication, which provides an state-of-the-art overview of the current research and will from the basis of future explorations.
Students of the rhetoric of the New Testament, the hellenistic period, the classical period and the patristic era will all find this volume useful and insightful, as will those with general interests in these subjects.

This publication has also been published in hardback (no longer available).