Editor: Stec
The centrepiece of this book is a critical edition of the Targum of Job which notes all variants from a total of 14 manuscripts and 2 printed editions.
In the introductory section the first two chapters give a description of the principal printed editions and the manuscripts. A chapter on "The Stemma" considers how the various strands of textual tradition relate to each other. There is also a chapter on "Multiple Translation", a phenomenon particularly associated with the Targum of Job whereby more than one translation is often given to whole verses or to individual words and phrases. A final chapter describes in detail the methods underlying the critical edition.
This book will provide a useful tool for those working on the textual criticism of the Old Testament and for those interested in the history of Jewish biblical exegesis.
In: Review of Central and East European Law
In: Review of Central and East European Law
Author: Stephen Stec

Abstract

The Peace of Westphalia released forces leading to the Industrial Revolution, ultimately freeing sovereign states to develop competing systems of economic development that had in common the uncontrolled exploitation of the environment. Over time, a law of humanity developed in response to the failings of a law of sovereign states in two main spheres: that of the dignity of the individual and that of matters of “common concern” that require a global, humanitarian response. Environmental issues have moved to the forefront of the latter, as can be demonstrated by an examination of terms used in international law to describe environmental matters, and have given rise to new forms of international and transnational cooperation. By being reminded that humanitarian issues of common concern were at the root of the Westphalian shift itself, we see that it is the radical form of sovereignty that developed in the 19th and 20th centuries that in fact proved inadequate. The key questions, therefore, are what the global environmental challenge teaches us about the potential for sovereignty to be “reclaimed” for humanity, and how and whence authoritative norms to modulate sovereignty will arise.

In: International Community Law Review
A Study of MS 798 of the Antonin Collection. Cambridge Genizah Studies Series Volume 5
Author: David M. Stec
The Genizah Psalms (MS 798 of the Antonin Collection) is a Hebrew document of messianic character, apparently presenting itself as the work of David. It is taken by some to date to the time of the second temple, and to be approximately contemporary with some of the literature of Qumran, while others regard it as a medieval composition. From the point of view of a classical hebraist, David M. Stec explores how this text relates to classical Hebrew literature as a whole and considers how viable it is to regard it as a genuine constituent of that body of literature. He presents an edition of the Hebrew text and English translation, together with an introduction, commentary and analysis of language.
In: Vetus Testamentum
In: Vetus Testamentum
In: Vetus Testamentum
Authors: Antypas, Jansen, Stec, and Gulacsy

Abstract

Mining gold with the use of cyanide has always been an inherently dangerous activity requiring strict regulatory oversight and the application of appropriate technology to prevent environmental harm. The cyanide spill from the Aurul S.A. gold-mining operation in Baia Mare, Romania, was a warning to the international community that legal and institutional regimes that should prevent and respond to such accidents may as yet not be fully developed, especially in countries in transition. In particular, the international legal regimes for industrial-accident prevention, liability, and foreign direct investment must be considered as a whole in order to identify gaps and weaknesses in the system that should be addressed in the effort to protect human health and the environment from such accidents. In addition, the gap between legal requirements and commitment to, and capacity for, implementation—especially in transition countries—must be addressed.This article addresses the need to bring attention to the international legal implications of the Baia Mare accident. First, the article sets the stage by briefly identifying the positive responses that the accident has evoked from Romanian and international stakeholders, indicating that steps have already been taken to strengthen the institutional and legal framework governing mining operations. Then, the international legal obligations of Romania at the time of the accident are examined, followed by the identification of international conventions to which Romania was not party at the time of the accident and that could have helped prevent the accident. Gaps in the international legal regimes relevant to the accident are also identified and recommendations are made for filling them, including principles of environmental governance for foreign investors in countries in transition. Recommendations are also made for addressing the issue of implementation.The accident at Baia Mare has resulted in a number of positive responses—both domestically in Romania, as well as regionally and at a broader European level—and it is incumbent upon stakeholders to continue to expand the scope of social learning that the accident has made available. Actions taken in Romania after the spill include closer cooperation between local/regional officials and environmental nongovernmental organizations and a generally increased sensitivity among NGOs to the dangers inherent in mining activities. NGOs have now assumed watchdog and public-education roles. Responses at the European level include greater transboundary cooperation in river management and a strong push by the European Union to amend the Seveso II Directive on industrial-accident prevention to cover mining operations.Romania was not party to several key international conventions that could conceivably, if implemented, have prevented or minimized the effects of the accident at Baia Mare or provided for a more effective long-term response. These include the Convention on the Transboundary Effects of Industrial Accidents and the Convention on the Law of the Non-navigational Uses of International Watercourses. In addition to international legal instruments to which Romania was not party, there are also European Union directives that Romania has not yet transposed into domestic law. As a country seeking to join the European Union, transposition of EU legislation is a high priority for Romania. Priority should be given to the Seveso II Directive, which seeks to prevent industrial accidents, and the directive on integrated pollution prevention and control, which requires the use of the best available technology to prevent discharges.Gaps and weaknesses in international law fall into three main categories: industrial-accident prevention, liability for environmental harm, and foreign direct investment.

In: Review of Central and East European Law