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This essay considers time and storytelling in Ulysses and the Odyssey by examining techniques used in the two texts to condense, distort and juxtapose periods of time. Ulysses’ many examples of playing with time (including, above all, the “Circe” episode) turn out to have parallels in the Odyssey, including the Odyssey’s use of sudden breaks between the divine and human levels of the poem. Similarly, Homer’s use of myth provides a parallel to the breaks in Ulysses between the psychological time of the characters’ internal monologue and the novel’s external narrative time – a distinction that also becomes progressively problematic as the novel’s stylistic experiments become more and more extreme. The essay explores how Joyce takes over and complicates a common interest of modernism, the contrast between psychological and “mechanical” time, and compares this to Homer’s use of the contrast between “historical” and “mythic” time. By layering these contrasts, Joyce brings out the complexity of the human experience of time, constantly influenced by the recreative forces of memory, hope and desire.

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In: Reading Joycean Temporalities

This essay considers time and storytelling in Ulysses and the Odyssey by examining techniques used in the two texts to condense, distort and juxtapose periods of time. Ulysses’ many examples of playing with time (including, above all, the “Circe” episode) turn out to have parallels in the Odyssey, including the Odyssey’s use of sudden breaks between the divine and human levels of the poem. Similarly, Homer’s use of myth provides a parallel to the breaks in Ulysses between the psychological time of the characters’ internal monologue and the novel’s external narrative time – a distinction that also becomes progressively problematic as the novel’s stylistic experiments become more and more extreme. The essay explores how Joyce takes over and complicates a common interest of modernism, the contrast between psychological and “mechanical” time, and compares this to Homer’s use of the contrast between “historical” and “mythic” time. By layering these contrasts, Joyce brings out the complexity of the human experience of time, constantly influenced by the recreative forces of memory, hope and desire.

Full Access
In: Reading Joycean Temporalities
In: Time and Trace: Multidisciplinary Investigations of Temporality
Comedy, Tragedy and the Polis in 5th Century Athens
Despite the many studies of Greek comedy and tragedy separately, scholarship has generally neglected the relation of the two. And yet the genres developed together, were performed together, and influenced each other to the extent of becoming polar opposites. In Aristophanes and His Tragic Muse, Stephanie Nelson considers this opposition through an analysis of how the genres developed, by looking at the tragic and comic elements in satyr drama, and by contrasting specific Aristophanes plays with tragedies on similar themes, such as the individual, the polis, and the gods. The study reveals that tragedy’s focus on necessity and a quest for meaning complements a neglected but critical element in Athenian comedy: its interest in freedom, and the ambivalence of its incompatible visions of reality.
In: Aristophanes and His Tragic Muse
In: Aristophanes and His Tragic Muse
In: Aristophanes and His Tragic Muse
In: Aristophanes and His Tragic Muse
In: Aristophanes and His Tragic Muse
In: Aristophanes and His Tragic Muse