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The Terror of the Seas?

Scottish Maritime Warfare, 1513-1713

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Steve Murdoch

This important new book provides the first detailed and clear analysis of the Scots involvement in naval warfare during the early modern period. The lazy use by both contemporaries and some modern authors of the word ‘piracy’ as a catch-all for all sorts of maritime activity obscures a complex picture of Scottish maritime warfare. Through the use of letters of marque and reprisal (rightly distinguished in this analysis) as well as dedicated Crown fleets, Scottish warfare against against a wide range of enemies are scrutinised. This is an impressive book that makes and important contribution to our knowledge of European naval warfare. Its formidably broad range of sources sheds light on many previously little known, or unknown, aspects of naval history. It also provides many valuable new perspectives on the importance of the sea to the Scots, and of the Scots to the naval history of the British Isles.
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Edited by Steve Murdoch

This volume deals with the entanglement of Scotland in the Thirty Years War (1618-1648), discussing both the diplomatic and military aspects of the conflict that led to Scottish involvement in the heart of the Holy Roman Empire. To the Scots, the war was linked to the fate of the Scottish princess, Elizabeth of Bohemia, rather than the politics of central Europe per se.
In three sections, the 12 authors have illuminated the political processes that led to the participation of as many as 50,000 Scottish troops in the war. The official alliances of the Stuart regime, the independent diplomacy of the Scottish Parliament and the actions of numerous well placed individuals at various European courts are all shown to have had a bearing on this important episode of European history.
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Network North

Scottish Kin, Commercial and Covert Associations in Northern Europe, 1603-1746

Steve Murdoch

This volume deals with the development, implementation and maintenance of Scottish networks in Northern Europe from c.1600-1746. The book contains nine chapters divided into three parts of original and innovative archival reseach. After an introduction providing a theoretical overview of the subject, the first section focusses on the associations of kith and kin, place and nation and confessional loyalty tested in the numerous case studies throughout the book.
Section two provides an analysis of Scottish networks in an economic context providing both quantitative and qualitative evidence to describe their success and failures in a variety of situations and locations. The final section provides three meticulously researched case studies of subversive networks including an espionage network operating in Poland on behalf of Sweden, the confessional network of the irenicist John Durie and rounded off with a review of the Jacobite network stretching across Russia, Sweden, Prussia and Rome.
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Fighting for Identity

Scottish Military Experiences c.1550-1900

Edited by Steve Murdoch and Andrew Mackillop

This volume examines the impact of military activity upon Scotland's national identity as the country underwent a fundamental transition through domestic centralisation at the turn of the seventeenth century, integration into the United Kingdom in 1707, and as a partner in Britain's global empire during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. It is divided into three thematic sections that examine the evolution of Scottish military identity over the early modern period, how the Highland region moved from a relationship of hostility to the Lowland political authorities to the central element in eighteenth and ninteenth century Scottish soldiering, and, finally, how aspects of Scotland's civilian society interrelated with her soldiers.
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Edited by Andrew Mackillop and Steve Murdoch

This volume examines Scotland's experience of and reaction to European expansion between c. 1600-1800. Although Scotland lacked an independent empire in the seventeenth century, it gained unfettered access to the global empire of England after 1707. The volume argues that, beneath this seemingly stark discontinuity, there lay considerable continuity. Using a series of case studies on Scottish governors serving in the empires of Denmark-Norway, Weden, and their eighteenth century Russian and British equivalents, it highlights the previously underestimated chronological and geographic extent of Scotland's engagement in European expansion. It concludes that a blend of informal networks of kinship and local association complemented the official status of Scottish governors and produced a relatively distinctive and effective strategy for participating in imperialism.
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Edited by Alexia Grosjean and Steve Murdoch

Migration is a fundamental feature of human experience. This extraordinary collection of essays focuses on a particularly intriguing sequence of migrations: those of Scots during the period 1600-1800. The book first considers the “near-abroad” (Ireland), the “middle-abroad” (Poland and Lithuania), and the “far-abroad” (the Americas), and then details a number of acutely revealing case histories of Scottish communities in Bergen (Norway), Rotterdam and the Maas (the Netherlands), Gothenburg (Sweden), Kèdainiai (Lithuania), and Hamburg (Germany). Then, concentrating on the Netherlands, the focus shifts to specific cultural/occupational milieux: exiles (usually for religious reasons), students, and soldiers or sailors. In conclusion, three leading scholars—Lex Heerma van Voss, Sølvi Søgner, and Thomas O’Connor—offer wider contextual perspectives that compare the Scottish experience with that of other countries. As Professor T.C. Smout says in his Foreword, “The present volume is a breakthrough, surely the biggest advance in the field for a hundred years.”

Contributors include: Douglas Catterall, David Dobson, Patrick Fitzgerald, Ginny Gardner, Alexia Grosjean, Lex Heerma van Voss, Waldemar Kowalski, Andrew Little, Esther Mijers, Steve Murdoch, Thomas O’Connor, Nina Østby Pedersen, T.C. Smout, Sølvi Sogner, Kathrin Zickermann, and Rimantas Žirgulis.
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Leos Müller and Steve Murdoch

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The Navigator

The Log of John Anderson, VOC Pilot-Major, 1640-1643

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Edited by Victor Enthoven, Steve Murdoch and Eila Williamson

Captain John Anderson served in the Dutch East India Company (VOC) as ‘Pilot-Major’ in a fleet of ships that set sail from Europe in December 1640, and returned with his ships in July 1643. This was Anderson’s fourth voyage to the East Indies.
His journey took three years during which time he safely brought a VOC fleet to Java and home again through tempests and full-scale battles with the Portuguese at sea.
In this, the first-ever edition of Anderson’s Journal, the editors have complemented his own words with chapters discussing the author’s contributions to the History of Warfare in Asia, Maritime Navigation and Early Modern Travel Writing.