Author: Stuart Molloy

Abstract

‘A Real Show of Horrors’ approaches torture through its representation in literature. The chapter compares Anthony Burgess’ A Clockwork Orange (1962) and Bret Easton Ellis’ American Psycho (1991) while juxtaposing the two novels’ representations of torture with three canonical legal-philosophical assessments of the practice: Article 1 of the United Nations Convention Against Torture (1984); Michel Foucault’s Discipline and Punish (1975); and Elaine Scarry’s The Body in Pain (1985). After surveying the structure of torture according to these sources, discussion focused on the literature proceeds around the notion of instrumentality and the role of imagination. What does torture try to accomplish, and what are the implications of imagining it?

In: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Torture
Editors: Lon Olson and Stuart Molloy
This volume offers diverse insights on how the practice of torture has impacted society and how we view human nature. After the Second World War, it was hoped that torture had been permanently vanquished among modern liberal states, and was only practiced by brutal totalitarian regimes. However, events after 9/11 revealed that the re-emergence of torture is an ever-present threat, even among leading democracies. Drawing from their knowledge of the humanities and social sciences, the contributors offer their expertise on the deleterious effects of torture and reveal that its trauma is interwoven into the fabric of modern society, requiring constant diligence to be rooted out and kept at bay. Contributors are William Fitzhugh Brundage, Federico Ciavattone, Noora Virjamo, Toni Koivulahti, Diana Medlicott, Stuart Molloy, Lon Olson, Martin Previsic, David Senesh and Hedi Viterbo.
In: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Torture
In: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Torture
In: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Torture
In: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Torture