Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 8 of 8 items for

  • Author or Editor: Stuart Young x
  • Search level: All x
Clear All
In: Ethical Exchanges in Translation, Adaptation and Dramaturgy
In: Ethical Exchanges in Translation, Adaptation and Dramaturgy
In: Ethical Exchanges in Translation, Adaptation and Dramaturgy
In: Ethical Exchanges in Translation, Adaptation and Dramaturgy
Ethical Exchanges in Translation, Adaptation and Dramaturgy examines compelling ethical issues that concern practitioners and scholars in the fields of translation, adaptation and dramaturgy. Its 11 essays, written by academic theorists as well as scholar-practitioners, represent a rich diversity of philosophies and perspectives, and reflect a broad international frame of reference: Asia, Europe, North America, and Australasia. They also traverse a wide range of theatrical forms: classic and contemporary playwrights from Shakespeare to Ibsen, immersive and interactive theatre, verbatim theatre, devised and community theatre, and postdramatic theatre.
In examining the ethics of specific artistic practices, the book highlights the significant continuities between translation, adaptation, and dramaturgy; it considers the ethics of spectatorship; and it identifies the tightly interwoven relationship between ethics and politics.

Although the vestibular system is involved in maintaining balance and posture control, recent studies have provided evidence for a crucial role of other sensory modalities in this task. In older adults, reduced visual capacity, specifically impaired depth perception and contrast sensitivity, has been associated with an increased risk of falls. Moreover, using the auditory-flash illusion (Shams et al., ) we recently reported that auditory–visual perception is less efficient in fall-prone older adults than in their age-matched counterparts (Setti et al., ) and that susceptibility increases with ageing. The aim of this study was to investigate whether balance training is associated with changes in how efficiently auditory and visual information is integrated in older adults. We tested 58 older (65+ years) adults, half of whom took part in a balance training intervention programme over a series of 5 weeks and half of whom were controls. Pre- and post-training measures of balance control (e.g., Berg Balance Scale) and movement-based signals (e.g., displacement of centre of pressure) across groups suggested that the intervention was successful in improving overall balance control. Furthermore, we found that susceptibility to the auditory-flash illusion did not increase for the intervention group, but did increase in the control group over time. Furthermore, following balance training our data suggest that audio–visual integration becomes relatively more efficient in fall-prone than in non-fall prone older adults. Our findings suggest important links between balance control and multisensory interactions in the ageing brain.

In: Seeing and Perceiving