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Tracing the Development of the Pirate Motif with Disney’s Pirates of the Caribbean
Postmodern Pirates offers a comprehensive analysis of Disney’s Pirates of the Caribbean series and the pirate motif through the lens of postmodern theories. Susanne Zhanial shows how the postmodern elements determine the movies’ aesthetics, narratives, and character portrayals, but also places the movies within Hollywood’s contemporary blockbuster machinery. The book then offers a diachronic analysis of the pirate motif in British literature and Hollywood movies. It aims to explain our ongoing fascination with the maritime outlaw, focuses on how a text’s cultural background influences the pirate’s portrayal, and pays special attention to the aspect of gender. Through the intertextual references in Pirates of the Caribbean, the motif’s development is always tied to Disney’s postmodern movie series.
In: Postmodern Pirates

Mainstream blockbusters have often been eschewed by academic criticism, although they have a huge impact on popular culture. This book uses postmodern film theories and a mainstream blockbuster series, Disney’s Pirates of the Caribbean, to investigate the development of the pirate motif in literature and film over the last two hundred years.

In: Postmodern Pirates

Disney’s Pirates of the Caribbean is analysed as an example of a postmodern blockbuster movie by successively applying the four postmodern criteria defined in the theory chapter and illustrating each criterion with a number of examples from the movies. Furthermore, the economic considerations and franchising are shown to be an essential part of Hollywood’s contemporary blockbuster machinery.

In: Postmodern Pirates

This chapter focuses on the pirate characters in Disney’s movie series. It highlights how Disney rewrites, and thus revives, the pirate motif for the twenty-first century. After a detailed analysis of the main pirate, Jack Sparrow, and its proclaimed uniqueness, the chapter compares and contrast Jack to the Gothic pirate villains and their crews, before turning to the role that love relationships, desires, and romance play in the movie series. The chapter also reads Pirates of the Caribbean alongside other postmodern movie series, most notably Star Wars, to reveal how they rely on the same character archetypes and power relations in order to appeal to a worldwide audience.

In: Postmodern Pirates

As a conclusion to the first part and its analysis of Disney’s Pirates of the Caribbean, this chapter stresses the importance of reading Disney’s movie series both in the context of Hollywood’s contemporary film industry and as postmodern. Both aspects help to explain the enormous popularity of the franchise.

In: Postmodern Pirates

The chapter first offers a brief introduction to postmodernism as an aesthetics and the development of Hollywood’s film industry in the late twentieth and twenty-first century. It compares and combines the main critical arguments of leading postmodern cultural critics with contemporary film theory, and develops a set of four aesthetic criteria to identify a movie as postmodern. The chapter highlights that postmodern elements are used in independent movies as well as in the tentpole hits of the big conglomerate studios, and therefore, mainstream blockbusters such as Walt Disney’s Pirates of the Caribbean, provide important insights into the study of Hollywood’s contemporary postmodern cinema.

In: Postmodern Pirates
In: Postmodern Pirates

The second part of the book traces the development of the pirate motif in both British literature and Hollywood film from the early nineteenth to the twenty-first century. Each chapter concentrates on one major period in order to show how the motif was adapted by authors to fit their cultural background and current aesthetics. In addition, every chapter closes with a comparative subchapter that highlights which elements of the period are reworked in Disney’s Pirates of the Caribbean.

In: Postmodern Pirates

This chapter illuminates the transition from historical travel reports to fictional representations of piracy, and highlights the difficulties of drawing a clear line between the two. It is also shown that Pirates of the Caribbean consciously plays upon this ambiguity when alluding to historical facts and figures.

In: Postmodern Pirates