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Chapter 10 Finnish-Russian Double Degree Programs

Abstract

Finnish and Russian universities have developed internationalization activities including double degree programs (double degrees), taking advantage of such benefits as their common border, membership of the Bologna Process and support from the governments of both countries. This chapter discusses how the division of responsibilities influences the implementation of master’s double degrees in Finnish-Russian partnerships. The research concentrates on cases of the internal allocation of responsibilities in double degrees within each partner university, including the role of central/faculty and administrative/academic departments. In addition, it investigates how Finnish and Russian universities allocate responsibilities for double degrees between one another. In conclusion, the chapter demonstrates the role of transaction costs challenging double degree implementation and university internationalization.

In: Responsibility of Higher Education Systems

Abstract

Finnish and Russian universities have developed internationalization activities including double degree programs (double degrees), taking advantage of such benefits as their common border, membership of the Bologna Process and support from the governments of both countries. This chapter discusses how the division of responsibilities influences the implementation of master’s double degrees in Finnish-Russian partnerships. The research concentrates on cases of the internal allocation of responsibilities in double degrees within each partner university, including the role of central/faculty and administrative/academic departments. In addition, it investigates how Finnish and Russian universities allocate responsibilities for double degrees between one another. In conclusion, the chapter demonstrates the role of transaction costs challenging double degree implementation and university internationalization.

In: Responsibility of Higher Education Systems
Chapter 6 Russia-EU Internationalisation of Higher Education

Abstract

Russia, due to its unique location simultaneously in Europe and Asia, has more than three centuries of higher education cooperation with the European states. The role of higher education cooperation has been defined by the changes in general political context, international relations. Approaches to interaction have varied from attempts to transplant European academic culture into national culture to the severe limitations of any contacts with Western higher education institutions.

The chapter explores the rationale and evolution of the role of higher education cooperation between Russia and Europe under the pressure of foreign policy and its changing priorities. In particular, the author considers Russia-EU internationalisation as part of the common trend of rising competition between different countries and regions of the European Higher Education Area (EHEA).

To understand the challenges for Russia-EU higher education cooperation in terms of the common framework provided by EHEA, the author studies different institutional environments where the universities of Russia and the EU member states implement internationalisation activities. The chapter overviews the policy tools to support the internationalisation of higher education in Russia, highlights the opportunities for Russia-EU cooperation and investigates the challenges produced by national traditions, EHEA and national law enforcement, and university governance practices, which have constrained Russia-EU higher education cooperation.

In: Building Higher Education Cooperation with the EU
Chapter 12 Opportunities and Challenges in Higher Education Cooperation between the EU and Four Continents

Abstract

In this concluding chapter, we draw lessons from the higher education cooperation between the EU and the four countries of Brazil, China, Russia and South Africa. Each of the previous chapters in this book provided a variety of good practices, challenges and suggestions. We aim to bring together these insights and reflect on these experiences through building a new typology for the internationalisation of higher education from the perspective of policy logics. The typology helps in understanding the dynamics and tensions between the global, national and institutional levels of higher education cooperation between the EU and the third countries.

In: Building Higher Education Cooperation with the EU
In: Building Higher Education Cooperation with the EU
Chapter 1 Higher Education Cooperation between the EU and Countries in Four Continents

Abstract

This chapter presents the main issues addressed by this book when analysing the experiences of cooperation between European Union and Brazil, China, Russia and South Africa. These four countries represent four continents, respectively South America, Asia, Europe and Africa. We chose them as important players in political and economic aspects in the EU’s international relations. These countries are also a major student source for the European higher education market; in recent years all of them have become keen to welcome students from the EU member states and to enhance their internationalisation activities in partnership with European higher education institutions.

The internationalisation of higher education receives support from different sides of society. Depending on the perspectives of participants or stakeholders, internationalisation of higher education may mean different things. In fact, one can argue that a successful initiative for university internationalisation answers the expectations of both the university’s internal and external stakeholders. However, it is not unusual that efforts to build a successful international partnership go into disarray. One of the challenges to effective internationalisation is the lack of real understanding of the partners’ perspective. Awareness of the differences in the rules shaping higher education around the world and of the diversity of goals and expectations each partner brings to the cooperation are the central issues that must be considered when building successful cooperation in higher education. Partners should be aware that higher education is a key factor, historically linked with the state building process and thus an integral part of any country’s identity. The complexity of the higher education system in any country should not be underestimated. By systematically studying the policies for the internationalisation of higher education in both the EU and some of its major partners in other continents and reviewing some concrete experiences, this book will further the understanding of the many challenges that stand in the way of building successful international cooperation in the higher education field.

In: Building Higher Education Cooperation with the EU
Part 2 Higher Education Cooperation and Internationalisation: Global and European Overview
In: Building Higher Education Cooperation with the EU
In: Building Higher Education Cooperation with the EU
Part 3 The Context of Higher Education Cooperation and Internationalisation in Countries of the Four Continents
In: Building Higher Education Cooperation with the EU
Part 4 Case Studies: How Higher Education Institutions of the EU and Countries from the Four Continents Collaborate
In: Building Higher Education Cooperation with the EU