Author: Swen Steinberg

Abstract

The National Socialist seizure of power in March 1933 was followed by the persecution of political opponents. Members and officials of the trade unions or the Social Democratic, Socialist, Liberal, and Communist parties often escaped this persecution by fleeing to border areas such as Northern Bohemia in Czechoslovakia. The decision to flee was frequently ad hoc. However, in many cases within this group of political refugees, the decision to go into exile was a process lasting months, sometimes even years. This process is analyzed in the following essay as a preliminary stage of exile by using the example of the Social Democratic party secretary, August Tröndle, from Dresden.

In: Vorstufen des Exils / Early Stages of Exile
In: War and Geography
Refugees from Nazi-occupied Europe in British Overseas Territories focusses on exiles and forced migrants in British colonies and dominions in Africa or Asia and in Commonwealth countries. The contributions deal with aspects such as legal status and internment, rescue and relief, identity and belonging, the Central European encounter with the colonial and post-colonial world, memories and generations or knowledge transfers and cultural representations in writing, painting, architecture, music and filmmaking. The volume covers refugee destinations and the situation on arrival, reorientation–and very often further migration after the Second World War–in Australia, Canada, India, Kenya, Palestine, Shanghai, Singapore, South Africa and New Zealand.

Contributors are: Rony Alfandary, Gerrit-Jan Berendse, Albrecht Dümling, Patrick Farges, Brigitte Mayr, Michael Omasta, Jyoti Sabharwal, Sarah Schwab, Ursula Seeber, Andrea Strutz, Monica Tempian, Jutta Vinzent, Paul Weindling, and Veronika Zwerger.
The Spatiality of Organized Mass Violence
War is always related to many different aspects, e.g. religion, technology etc. However, one of the aspects of central importance for the history of warfare is geography. The present volume will analyze this interrelationship from several different perspectives.
Geography is not only integral to the planning of tactics and strategies, but plays an important role in the outcome of war and its longterm aftermath. Furthermore, the interplay between war and geography is not purely a modern phenomenon but can be traced back through the ages of history. Geography always had the potential of providing an advantage or disadvantage.
The aim of the volume is to grant historical perspectives on that special interrelationship in different time periods and regional settings. The purpose is to provide a deeper insight and an interdisciplinary discussion, which will open new perspectives on military history in general and the history of warfare in particular.