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Abstract

In this chapter I present the two strategies for negation present in the Ehe-Khenim dialect of the Kurripako-Baniwa continuum. After a brief background of the language and its speakers, I provide examples collected in the field of the various strategies, and describe their similarities and differences, in order to provide more data on this under-described and endangered language. One strategy employs the negative marker khenim and its contraction khen and the other involves the commonly-found privative Arawak morphological marker ma-. The negative marker khenim is used for most verbs and for clause linking construcions. It is positioned preverbally and focused elements antecede it. It attracts most tense and aspect markers when in clause linking constructions. The privative marker is used for stative verbs and for prohibitives, though stative verbs may also be negated with the negative marker khenim.

In: Negation in Arawak Languages
In: Negation in Arawak Languages
In: Negation in Arawak Languages
In: Negation in Arawak Languages
Negation in Arawak Languages presents detailed descriptions of negation constructions in nine Arawak languages (Apurinã, Garifuna, Kurripako, Lokono, Mojeño Trinitario, Nanti, Paresi, Tariana, and Wauja), as well as an overview of negation in this major language family. Functional-typological in orientation, each descriptive chapter in the volume is based on fieldwork by authors in the communities in which the languages are spoken. Chapters describe standard negation, prohibitives, existential negation, negative indefinites, and free negation, as well as language-specific negation phenomena such as morphological privatives, the interaction of negation with verbal inflectional categories, and negation in clause-linking constructions.

Informed by typological approaches to negation, this volume will be of interest to specialists in Arawak languages, typologists, historical linguists, and theoretical linguists.