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  • Author or Editor: Tatsuya Ide x
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Diplogasteroides luxuriosae n. sp. is described from a species of longhorn beetle, Acalolepta luxuriosa (Cerambycidae), associated with a broad-leaved tree, Aralia elata (Araliaceae), from the Ibaraki and Kyoto Prefectures of Japan. Besides its generic (or intrageneric species group-specific) characteristics, the new species is characterised and distinguished from its close relatives by its apomorphic characteristics, i.e., broad spicule with a trapezoidal shape, gubernaculum with pointed anterior, and posterior ends with two gland-like cells dorsally overlapping the vas deferens of males and large and wide receptaculum seminis of females. The new species is molecularly similar to two recently described Diplogasteroides spp., D. andrassyi and D. asiaticus. However, D. luxuriosae n. sp. is molecularly distinguished from these two species by the 6-7 bp difference in near-full-length small subunit (18S) and 10-14 bp differences in D2-D3 expansion segments of large subunit (28S) ribosomal RNA genes.

In: Nematology

Summary

Bursaphelenchus tadamiensis, which was initially isolated from a stag beetle, Dorcus striatipennis, collected from sap flow of Quercus crispula in Fukushima, north-eastern Japan, was re-isolated three times from sap flow of Quercus spp. in western Japan. The re-isolated populations were mostly morphologically consistent with the type population, but the male bursal flap showed high variations in the newly collected populations. Molecularly, the type and new populations showed differences in the internal transcribed spacer region of ribosomal DNA and mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I gene, suggesting that the species is genetically divided into several local populations. The isolation pattern of B. tadamiensis, i.e., the species was initially isolated from sap flow-associated beetles and subsequently isolated from sap flow, suggests that the species prefers and is adapted to the sap flow environment as its habitat.

In: Nematology

Summary

Three parasitaphelenchid species, Parasitaphelenchus frontalis n. sp., P. costati n. sp. and Bursaphelenchus hirsutae n. sp., are described. Parasitaphelenchus frontalis n. sp. was isolated from the body cavity of Scolytus frontalis emerging from dead logs of Zelkova serrata collected from Kanagawa, Japan, and characterised by its four-lined lateral field in the adults and dome-shaped lip region of the parasitic juveniles. Whereas the two first-mentioned species were isolated from Alniphagus costatus, B. hirsutae n. sp. emerged from dead logs of Alnus hirsuta collected from Nagano, Japan. Parasitaphelenchus costati n. sp. and B. hirsutae n. sp. were recovered from the body cavity and the underside of the elytra of their host/carrier beetle, respectively. Parasitaphelenchus costati n. sp. is characterised by its three-lined lateral field in adults and the presence of a ventrally-directed hook on the lip region of the parasitic juvenile. Bursaphelenchus hirsutae n. sp. belongs to the eggersi group of the genus and is characterised by its three-lined lateral field, dorsally truncate condylus and pointed rostrum of males, and long, smoothly tapering and strongly ventrally recurved, female tail. Molecular characterisation is provided for all three new species and their phylogenys discussed.

In: Nematology

As a first step in developing a quick, accurate and simple method for the diagnosis of red ring disease, the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP)-based identification procedure was applied to the causative agent, Bursaphelenchus cocophilus. Two LAMP primer sets were designed using two loci of ribosomal RNA genes, i.e., D2-D3 expansion segments of the large subunit (D2-D3 LSU), and internal transcribed spacers (ITS). Within those two sets of primers, the D2-D3 LSU primer set successfully yielded amplicons from B. cocophilus nematode lysate prepared from 3-year-old DESS-fixed specimens. The specificity of the primers was examined using 18 species of confamilial Aphelenchoididae nematodes and primer sensitivity was tested using a diluted series of B. cocophilus lysate. The primer set did not amplify the DNA from other aphelenchoidids, and sensitivity was achieved by ‘1:100 diluted’ B. cocophilus DNA (roughly 1/1500 of total DNA from a single third-stage juvenile).

In: Nematology

The morphological characteristics of dauer juveniles were examined for Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, B. firmae and B. mucronatus kolymensis. Dauer juveniles of B. xylophilus and B. firmae were collected directly from their carrier insects, Monochamus alternatus and M. grandis, respectively. Bursaphelenchs m. kolymensis dauer juveniles were induced experimentally using M. alternatus pupae. The dauer juveniles of these three species were distinguished according to their respective body shapes. Bursaphelenchus xylophilus was relatively slender compared to the other species. The position of the excretory pore was anterior to the median bulb in B. firmae, overlapping with the median bulb in B. xylophilus, and posterior to, or overlapping with, the posterior part of the median bulb in B. m. kolymensis. The tail tip of B. firmae was conical, that of B. xylophilus contained a short projection, while in B. m. kolymensis the tail tip was blunt with a thick mucron.

In: Nematology

Summary

Two new species and a new subspecies of Bursaphelenchus are described. Bursaphelenchus carpini n. sp. and B. cryphali okhotskensis n. subsp. were isolated from Cryphalus carpini emerged from a dead log of a Carpinus sp. collected in Ibaraki Prefecture, Japan, and from C. piceae emerged from a dead log of Abies sachalinensis collected in Hokkaido, Japan, respectively. Meanwhile, B. laciniatae n. sp. was isolated from the bark of dead Ulmus laciniata, which harboured Scolytus esuriens galleries, collected in Hokkaido, Japan. These three species phylogenetically belong to the eggersi/eremus-group clade and share common typological characters such as a relatively slender body, three-lined lateral field, male spicule with a well-developed condylus, short and wide blade (calomus-lamina complex) and lack of clear cucullus. These three species and subspecies can be distinguished from one another and their close relatives by the condylus shape, female tail shape and phylogenetic and biological characters.

In: Nematology