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H.C. Teitler

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H.C. Teitler

Abstract

Christian sources name several dozen Christian martyrs under Julian the Apostate. Six of these martyrs were according to such sources executed in Antioch during Julian’s stay in this city in 362-363 A.D. Pagan authors like Ammianus Marcellinus and Libanius are silent about their martyrdom, and about the persecution of Christians by Julian in general. It is examined in this article whether the Christian authors, among them John Chrysostom, represent historical reality more than Ammianus and Libanius do, and whether their writings can be adduced to prove that Julian was a persecutor.

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A Dutch Spy in China

Reports on the First Phase of the Sino-Japanese War (1937-1939)

Edited by Ger Teitler and Bernd Radtke

The Sino-Japanese war is one of the most important links in the development of the modern Far East. A Dutch Spy in China offers a selection from the reports written by a Dutch colonel at the request of the General Staff of the Royal Netherlands Indies Army. After his retirement colonel De Fremery joined the group of Western military specialists who were helping Chiang Kai Shek in his efforts to modernize the Nationalist Chinese armed forces. Having acted in an advisory capacity for several years, De Fremery resigned but continued to live in China.
Mounting anxiety in the East-Indies about Japan’s military activity urged the authorities to collect as much information about the Japanese armed forces as possible. De Fremery’s reports on the Sino-Japanese war were in this period a most welcome source of information.
Contemporary reports on this conflict by militarily qualified Western observers are very rare. Colonel De Fremery’s account of the struggle forms an important contribution to our knowledge of its military aspects.
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Notarii en Exceptores

Een onderzoek naar rol en betekenis van notarii en exceptores in dienst van overheid en kerk in de Romeinse keizertijd (tot circa 450 A.D.)

Hans C. Teitler

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Notarii and exceptores

An inquiry into role and significance of shorthand writers in the Imperial and ecclesiastical bureaucracy of the Roman Empire (from the Early Principate to c. 450 A.D.)

Hans C. Teitler

In 411 AD an ecclesiastical conference was held in Carthage under the presidency of Flavius Marcellinus, tribunus et notarius. On that occasion exceptores and notarii ecclesiastici acted as shorthand writers. Thus at this conference we meet three species of one genus at different stages of their development: a tribunus et notarius, a high imperial official who, despite his title, probably did not know how to write shorthand; exceptores, minor civil servants working in public offices who were certainly stenographers at the time and notarii ecclesiastici, ecclesiastical bureaucrats whose task at the Carthaginian conference was to assist the exceptores with their work, but who at other times were more like tribuni et notarii. With the situation in 411 AD as a starting point an attempt is made to sketch the role and significance of notarii and exceptores in the Roman Empire, from the Early Principate to circa 450 AD.