Search Results

Restricted Access

Series:

Tekla Mecsnóber

Joyce was not always directly involved in decisions regarding the material shape in which Ulysses reached potential readers, but his interest in visual aspects of the written word appears to have made its impact on the novel’s text as well. Examining the specific significance of type choice – as part of the bibliographic code – in designing and promoting Ulysses as a printed text, this study traces some of the salient changes that accompanied the novel’s development from its first serialisation in the little magazines of the 1910s to its appearance as book in various editions of the 1920s, 1930s and in 1940 (the last to be issued during Joyce’s lifetime). It also draws upon contemporary and later assessments of the “character” of relevant typefaces and highlights the role of some influential European and American typographers, anchoring these early editions among the revivalist and modernist design trends of the interwar years. These analyses suggest that whereas the typography of most of the earlier editions, as well as their publicity materials, tended to rely on historicising typefaces to convey connotations of classic dignity, artistic quality and craftsmanship, editions in the 1930s began to borrow from modernist typographic trends to promote the book as a modern work.

Restricted Access

Joycean Unions

Post-Millennial Essays from East to West

Series:

Edited by R. Brandon Kershner and Tekla Mecsnóber

This exciting new volume presents recent research by internationally recognised Joyce scholars from Europe and North America. Entitled Joycean Unions: Post-Millennial Essays from East to West, it pays particular attention to contemporary Eastern and Western European perspectives on the immensely influential work of the Irish writer James Joyce (1882-1941). The essays collected in this volume uncover various European sources of inspiration for Joyce’s early aesthetic theories, for the “Sirens”, “Cyclops”, “Circe” and “Eumaeus” episodes of his modernist masterwork Ulysses (1922) and for his last tour de force Finnegans Wake (1939). They present inspiring new ways of reading Joyce’s work, re-investigate the fascinating phenomenon of literary “error”, and review aspects of Joyce’s varied afterlife in Ireland and Eastern Europe. The book will be of interest to scholars, students and the general audience interested in English literature, Modernism, European Studies, Irish Studies and of course the works of James Joyce.
Restricted Access

Publishing in Joyce's Ulysses

Newspapers, Advertising and Printing

Series:

Edited by William Brockman, Tekla Mecsnóber and Sabrina Alonso

Appearing in an era of rapid change in the printing and publishing industries, James Joyce’s Ulysses exploited and exemplified those industries to the degree that the book can be seen as a virtual museum of 1904 media. Publishing in Joyce's “Ulysses”: Newspapers, Advertising and Printing, edited by William S. Brockman, Tekla Mecsnóber and Sabrina Alonso, gathers twelve essays by Joyce scholars exploring facets of those trades that pervade the substance of the book. Essays explore the book’s incorporation of mass-market weekly magazines, contemporary advertising slogans, newspaper clippings, the “Aeolus” episode’s printing office and the varied typographic styles of successive editions of Ulysses. Placing Joyce’s work in its historical milieu, the collection offers a fresh perspective on modern print culture.

Contributors are: Sabrina Alonso, Harald Beck, William S. Brockman, Elisabetta d'Erme, Judith Harrington, Matthew Hayward, Sangam MacDuff, Tekla Mecsnóber, Tamara Radak, Fritz Senn, David Spurr, Jolanta Wawrzycka.
Restricted Access

Series:

Edited by William S. Brockman, Tekla Mecsnóber and Sabrina Alonso