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In: The Uses of the Bible in Crusader Sources
In: The Uses of the Bible in Crusader Sources
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In his Gorgias, Plato is not merely concerned with criticizing Sophists, tyrants, or immoral uses of rhetoric. Rather he explores the harmful consequences of living without loving wisdom. A large part of the dialogue is devoted to pointing out the difficulties associated with practicing philosophy as a way of life. These difficulties are so great that the best way of arguing for its practice is to dramatize the harmful consequences inherent in rival ways of life that deny the need for wisdom. Thus the Gorgias explores the harmful effects of Callicles’ denial of his need for wisdom. Socrates shows that Callicles does not know what he wants or needs. Instead of letting his awareness of ignorance blossom in love of wisdom, however, Callicles pursues power. Yet this love of power leads to disharmony and turmoil. In the Gorgias, Plato’s rhetorical defence of philosophy amounts to this: the only thing more difficult than living with the love of wisdom is living without it.

In: Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek and Roman Political Thought
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Abstract

Politics I has been the subject of a number of textual questions about the relation of the Ethics to the Politics. These textual questions involve us in theoretical questions about the differences between contemporary and ancient conceptions of political rule. Resolving the exegetical challenges can help us clarify the theoretical differences. A fresh approach to the textual challenges reveals that Politics I has a contrapuntal character with two reinforcing movements. One explores why and how despotic conceptions of politics fail using case studies of despotic power: slavery and money-making. Aristotle shows dialectically how this despotic approach to rule undermines the requirements for political life. The other movement explores the character of natural human associations, culminating in the polis. The two movements converge in Aristotle’s claim about the centrality of the human good for political rule. This claim challenges modern social contract theory’s understanding of the differences between despotic and political rule.

In: Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek and Roman Political Thought
In: Security Flashpoints
In: Alliances for Advancing Academic Women
In: Alliances for Advancing Academic Women

Amino acids were traditionally classified as nutritionally essential or nonessential for swine based on nitrogen balance and growth. It was also assumed without much evidence that pigs could synthesize sufficient amounts of all nonessential amino acids to support maximum production performance. Thus, over the past 50 years, much emphasis has been placed on the roles for dietary essential amino acids as building blocks for tissue proteins. Disappointingly, the current version of NRC does not recommend dietary requirements of so called ‘nonessential amino acids’ by neonatal, post-weaning, growing-finishing, or gestating pigs. However, a large body of literature shows that these nonessential amino acids, particularly glutamine and arginine, play important roles in regulating gene expression at both transcriptional and translational levels in animals. Additionally, both isotopic and digestive studies have established that large amounts of amino acids in the enteral diet are degraded by the small intestine during the first pass. Thus, only 5% of glutamate and aspartate, 30-33% of glutamine, and 60-65% of proline and arginine in the diet enter the portal circulation. Dynamic synthesis of amino acids via inter-organ metabolism depends on essential amino acids and may be suboptimal in pigs at various stages of the life cycle. Amino acids participate in cell signaling via mammalian target of rapamycin, AMP-activated protein kinase, extracellular signal-related kinase, Jun kinase, mitogen-activated protein kinase, and gases (NO, CO and H2S). Exquisite integration of these regulatory networks has profound effects on cell proliferation, differentiation, metabolism, homeostasis, survival, and function. Importantly, recent advances in understanding of functional amino acids are transforming the practice of swine nutrition. Particularly, dietary supplementation

In: Dynamics in animal nutrition
Von Bergson bis Deleuze
Ereignis auf Französisch bringt ein Stück Klarheit in das Dunkel der Vorstellungen, die gegenwärtig um das „Ereignis“ kreisen. Der 11. September hat erneut gezeigt: Es gibt eine Unkalkulierbarkeit sowohl des Ereignisses selbst wie auch der von ihm ausgelösten Folgen. Hierzu ist es hilfreich, die Philosophinnen und Philosophen zu Wort kommen zu lassen, die mit kaltem Verstand und sehenden Auges deren empirische Einmaligkeit und strukturelle Wiederkehr durchdacht haben. Erstmals werden die französischen Philosophien unter dem Gesichtspunkt des Ereignisses diskutiert, obwohl sie es waren, die überhaupt Ereignistheorien im großen Maßstab entwickelt haben. Der Band versammelt im ersten Teil Beiträge, die auf die deutschsprachige Vorgeschichte der französischen „Ereignisphilosophie“ Bezug nehmen. Neben Nietzsche und Husserl steht Heidegger zur Diskussion. Heidegger hat das „Ereignis“ zum Schlüsselbegriff seines Denkens gemacht und damit die entscheidende Vorlage für die – zumeist kritischen – Anknüpfungen in Frankreich geliefert. Im zweiten Teil werden Text für Text ausgewählte Positionen der französischen Philosophie zum Ereignis vorgestellt: Bergson, Merleau-Ponty, Sartre, Lacan, Levinas, Ricœur, Foucault, Derrida, Lyotard, Richir, Henry, Badiou. Der dritte Teil enthält dann eine ausführliche Erörterung bestimmter Facetten der Philosophie von Gilles Deleuze, der sich besonders intensiv mit der Problematik des Ereignisses auseinandergesetzt hat.