Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 17 items for

  • Author or Editor: Tiina Kinnunen x
  • Search level: All x
Clear All
Author:

Abstract

This chapter associates nationalism with individual agency and lived experience, and pays close attention to emotions that constituted agency. The focus is on how Finnish author and journalist Alexandra Gripenberg (1857–1913) expressed her private, personal feelings as she balanced her interconnected roles as a Swedish-speaking feminist activist of the Finnish-minded Fennoman movement and as an transnational activist of the international feminist movement. My argument is that, ultimately, after years of hard work, inspired by the idea of a unified Finnish people under Fennoman guidance, Gripenberg’s thoughts and feelings were filled with a sense of loss. She lost her faith in the sound development of the Finnish nation as ordinary people seemed to leave this guidance, inspired for instance by the socialist messages, and her experience of national belonging gradually turned into disillusionment. As this happened, she strongly felt that she had personally sacrificed too much, particularly an international career and a career as a fiction writer, writing in Swedish. The Fennoman program envisioned a Finnish-speaking nation, which threatened the Swedish-speakers’ future. In this respect, I suggest that it is not self-evident that Gripenberg saw the end of the Swedish-speaking culture and population in Finland as a national sacrifice without meaning.

In: Nineteenth-Century Nationalisms and Emotions in the Baltic Sea Region
In: The Finnish Civil War 1918
In: The Finnish Civil War 1918
History, Memory, Interpretations
Volume Editors: and
This volume brings together a rich array of original contributions - hitherto unavailable in English - on Finland during World War II and the place of the war in Finnish collective memory. Providing readers with a solid narrative of the war's political and military framework from a Finnish perspective, this volume also offers well-argued analyses of the ideological, social and cultural aspects of a society at war. As part of the complex legacy of the war it discusses the 'Karelian question' and the Holocaust in Finnish public memory, topics often neglected in international scholarship. Besides a historical narrative, this volume, with its thorough introduction, also reveals to readers the history and current state of Finnish historiography of World War II.
Contributors are Outi Fingerroos, Sonja Hagelstam, Antero Holmila, Markku Jokisipilä, Michael Jonas, Marianne Junila, Tiina Kinnunen, Ville Kivimäki, Helene Laurent, Henrik Meinander, Tenho Pimiä, Oula Silvennoinen, Tuomas Tepora, and Pasi Tuunainen.
In: Finland in World War II
In: Finland in World War II
In: Finland in World War II
In: Finland in World War II