Editor: Tim Corcoran
Psychology’s contribution to education has produced a persuasive and burgeoning literature willing to measure (e. g. intelligence quotients), categorise (e. g. learning and/or behavioural difficulties) and pathologise (e. g. psychiatric disorders) students across learning contexts. Practices like these pervade relationships existing between psychology and education because they share in common certain views of people and the worlds in which they learn.
There is however increased acknowledgement that contemporary practice demands alternate ways of working. As learning communities and educators endeavour to make a difference in peoples’ lives, they are critically questioning how their use of psychology in education constitutes future possibilities for personhood and psychosocial action.
In this book, a group of respected international scholars examine controversies presently facing the enduring relationship between psychology and education. The book will appeal to readers who are interested in the innovative development and application of psychological theories and practices in/to education. The book will be of interest to transnational audiences and is accessible to scholars and students in disciplines including psychology, education, sociology, social work, youth studies, public and allied health.
The volume includes contributions from: Tom Billington, Christopher Boyle, Lise Bird Claiborne, Tim Corcoran, Greg Goodman, Jack Martin, Athanasios Marvakis and Ioanna Petritsi, Jace Pillay, Isaac Prilleltensky, Anna Stetsenko, Jeff Sugarman and Stephen Vassallo with a Foreword by Ben Bradley.
In: Inclusive Education
In: Psychology in Education
In: Psychology in Education
In: Psychology in Education
Authors: Tim Corcoran and Ben Whitburn

Abstract

This chapter attends to the messy work of conceptualising inclusive education in three main ways: through the lament of ineffective implementation of inclusive policy; rights-based discourse; and through the presence of paradoxes. We consider work from New Zealand ( by Carol Hamilton), Poland ( by Eugeiusz Świtała) and The Netherlands ( by Wiel Veugelers and Yvonne Leeman). Core to our argument is that the theoretical resources used to conceptualise inclusive education frequently set in place parameters that perpetuate segregation. To this end we advance tussling with anomalies – exploring how paradoxes present in the everyday orientate our commitment to relationalities.

In: Moving towards Inclusive Education
What to Do about Inclusive Education
Who’s in? Who’s out? Who decides? What are we going to do about inclusive education? What kind of world do we want our children to live in? How might education help us to achieve that vision for our children?

In Who’s In? Who’s Out? What to Do about Inclusive Education, a group of respected international scholars come together to think about education at a momentous time in global history, where the world has fractured, people are displaced and we search for new research, education programmes and political leadership to restore social cohesion and rebuild school systems that may claim to be an apprenticeship in democracy.

This book highlights the challenges inclusive education researchers take on in working to dismantle barriers involving access, presence, participation and success in education.

Contributors include: Elga Andriana, Michael Apple, Ann Cheryl Armstrong, Marnie Best, Roseanna Bourke, Jenni Carter, Kathy Cologon, Tim Corcoran, Deborah Crossing, Simona D’Alessio, Rosemary Ann du Plessis, David Evans, Lani Florian, Cameron Forrest, Christine Grima-Farrell, Bjørn F. Hamre, Leechin Heng, Amitya Kumara, Bindi MacGill, Laisiasa Merumeru, John Munro, Patricia O’Brien, John O’Neill, Sulochini Pather, Deborah Price, Merelesita Qeleni, Kathleen Quinlivan, Puti Ayu Setiani, Peta Skujins, Roger Slee, John Stanwick, and Peter Walker.
Education systems worldwide will only successfully serve the needs of people with disability when we inclusively examine and address disabling issues that currently exist at school level education as well as further and higher education and beyond. The chapters contributing to this edited volume are presented to assist readers with a critical examination of contemporary practice and offer a concerted response to improving inclusive education. The chapters address a range of important topics related to the field of critical disability studies in education and include sections dedicated to Schools, Higher Education, Family and Community and Theorising. The contributors entered into discussions during the 2014 AERA Special Interest Group annual meeting hosted by Victoria University in Australia. The perspectives offered here include academic, practitioner, student and parent with contributions from Australia, New Zealand, Nigeria, the UK and the US, providing transnational interest. This book will appeal to readers who are interested in innovative theoretical approaches, practical applications and personal narratives. The Introduction by Professor Roger Slee (The Victoria Institute, Victoria University, Australia) and Afterword by Professor David Connor (City University of New York) provide insightful and important commentary.
Cover photograph by Paul Dunn and design by Hendrik Jacobs.
In: Journal of Disability Studies in Education

This paper provides the historical and theoretical foundations for the emergent field of Disability Studies in Education. Disability Studies in Education proceeds from the trans-disciplinary work we find in the continuing development of Disability Studies. It applies the principles and conceptual threads of Disability Studies to critique the ableist traditions, structures and cultures of education and to suggest how education might be otherwise. The paper makes clear the distinction between special education and disability studies in education. Special education has proven its resilience and willingness to appropriate the discourse of inclusive education in order to adapt and sustain its core assumptions about children with disabilities and their education. Accordingly, it is critical that this journal make explicit the distinctions between the conceptual foundations and practical applications of special education and Disability Studies in Education. This first paper is an attempt at draw these lines of distinctions and the aspirations for the Journal of Disability Studies in Education.

In: Journal of Disability Studies in Education