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Edited by Tina (A.C.) Besley

Tina Besley has edited this collection which examines and critiques the ways that different countries, particularly Commonwealth and European states, assess the quality of educational research in publicly funded higher education institutions. Such assessment often ranks universities, departments and even individual academics, and plays an important role in determining the allocation of funding to support university research. Yet research is only one aspect of academic performance alongside teaching and service or administration components. The book focuses on the theoretical and practical issues that accompany the development of national and international systems of research assessment, particularly in the field of education. In our interconnected, globalised world, some of the ideas of assessment that have evolved in one country have almost inevitably travelled elsewhere especially the UK model. Consequently the book comprises an introduction, eighteen chapters that discuss the situation in ten countries, followed by a postscript. It gathers together an outstanding group of twenty-five prominent international scholars with expertise in the field of educational research and includes many with hands-on experience in the peer review process. The book is designed to appeal to a wide group of people involved as knowledge workers and knowledge managers—academics, students and policy makers - in higher education and interested in assessment and accountability mechanisms and processes.

Introduction

Assessing the quality of educational research in higher education: The impact of the knowledge economy and mergers

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Tina (A.C.) Besley

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Tina A.C. Besley

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Tina A.C. Besley

Counseling Youth

Foucault, Power and the Ethics of Subjectivity

Tina (A.C.) Besley

Using the work of Foucault, this study examines changing notions of the self and identity and how psychological and sociological discourses have conceptualized and constituted adolescence/youth as the primary client in school counseling. Case studies of mental hygiene films in the United States and a moral panic in New Zealand are used to examine how youth were morally constituted in the postwar period—a time when guidance counseling emerged in Western countries such as the United States, the United Kingdom, Australia, Canada, and New Zealand. The author uses Foucault’s notion of governmentality to critically examine how counseling professionalized itself as a disciplinary body. This book is targeted at practicing counselors, counseling students and counselor theoreticians. It will also find audiences with graduate students in youth studies and those interested in the work and applications of Michel Foucault.
One of the best things that I can say about this book is that it had a personal impact. It nudged me into re-thinking various aspects of my work. It is a book that achieves a rare thing. It talks about counseling young people without getting so caught up in the detail of practice that it loses sight of the big picture …I believe that school counselors who engage with this work will find that their practice is never quite the same again. They will be invited to think about things they have previously taken for granted and to listen to young people in new ways.
John Winslade, Coordinator of Counselor Education, California State University San Bernardino. Co-Author of Narrative Counseling in Schools: Powerful & Brief.

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Tina (A.C.) Besley and Michael A. Peters

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Tina (A.C.) Besley and Michael A. Peters