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Volume Editor: Ton Hoenselaars
In: Imagology
In: Poetica
In: Imagology
Volume Editors: Ton Hoenselaars and Jelle Koopmans
Volume Editors: Ton Hoenselaars and Marius Buning
The thirty essays in English Literature and the Other Languages trace how the tangentiality of English and other modes of language affects the production of English literature, and investigate how questions of linguistic code can be made accessible to literary analysis. This collection studies multilingualism from the Reformation onwards, when Latin was an alternative to the emerging vernacular of the Anglican nation; the eighteenth-century confrontation between English and the languages of the colonies; the process whereby the standard British English of the colonizer has lost ground to independent englishes (American, Canadian, Indian, Caribbean, Nigerian, or New Zealand English), that now consider the original standard British English as the other languages the interaction between English and a range of British language varieties including Welsh, Irish, and Scots, the Lancashire and Dorset dialects, as well as working-class idiom; Chicano literature; translation and self-translation; Ezra Pound's revitalization of English in the Cantos; and the psychogrammar and comic dialogics in Joyce's Ulysses, As Norman Blake puts it in his Afterword to English Literature and the Other Languages: There has been no volume such as this which tries to take stock of the whole area and to put multilingualism in literature on the map. It is a subject which has been neglected for too long, and this volume is to be welcomed for its brave attempt to fill this lacuna.
Volume Editors: Rui Carvalho Homem and Ton Hoenselaars
Most of the contributions to Translating Shakespeare for the Twenty-First Century evolve from a practical commitment to the translation of Shakespearean drama and at the same time reveal a sophisticated awareness of recent developments in literary criticism, Shakespeare studies, and the relatively new field of Translation studies. All the essays are sensitive to the criticism to which notions of the original as well as distinctions between the creative and the derivative have been subjected in recent years. Consequently, they endeavour to retrieve translation from its otherwise subordinate status, and advance it as a model for all writing, which is construed, inevitably, as a rewriting. This volume offers a wide range of responses to the theme of Shakespeare and translation as well as Shakespeare in translation. Diversity is ensured both by the authors’ varied academic and cultural backgrounds, and by the different critical standpoints from which they approach their themes – from semiotics to theatre studies, and from gender studies to readings firmly rooted in the practice of translation. Translating Shakespeare for the Twenty-First Century is divided into two complementary sections. The first part deals with the broader insights to be gained from a multilingual and multicultural framework. The second part focuses on Shakespearean translation into the specific language and the culture of Portugal.