Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 27 items for

  • Author or Editor: Tony Richie x
  • Search level: All x
Clear All
Author:

Abstract

The focus of this chapter is on innovative efforts to educate Evangelical/Pentecostal seminarians and university students regarding interfaith (i.e. multifaith) understanding, dialogue, and cooperation. Most of these efforts have been conducted at the Pentecostal Theological Seminary (pts) with related activities at Lee University. Both institutions are located in Cleveland, Tennessee, as educational ministries of the Church of God, which has international offices in Cleveland as well. 1 Additionally, annual academic conferences and publications of the Society for Pentecostal Studies have provided a broader forum for promoting multifaith understanding, dialogue, and cooperation among member institutions with their respective scholars. 2

The structure of this chapter is threefold. First, I outline the philosophy behind an explicitly Pentecostal pedagogy for teaching on interfaith topics in higher education contexts. Second, I survey the current state of the Christian theology of religions among Pentecostal thinkers and practitioners. The third section recounts specific educational praxis through classroom instruction and guided encounters. I discuss symbiotic concerns and questions as they arise in each section.

Open Access
In: Critical Perspectives on Interreligious Education
Author:

Abstract

The focus of this chapter is on innovative efforts to educate Evangelical/Pentecostal seminarians and university students regarding interfaith (i.e. multifaith) understanding, dialogue, and cooperation. Most of these efforts have been conducted at the Pentecostal Theological Seminary (pts) with related activities at Lee University. Both institutions are located in Cleveland, Tennessee, as educational ministries of the Church of God, which has international offices in Cleveland as well. 1 Additionally, annual academic conferences and publications of the Society for Pentecostal Studies have provided a broader forum for promoting multifaith understanding, dialogue, and cooperation among member institutions with their respective scholars. 2

The structure of this chapter is threefold. First, I outline the philosophy behind an explicitly Pentecostal pedagogy for teaching on interfaith topics in higher education contexts. Second, I survey the current state of the Christian theology of religions among Pentecostal thinkers and practitioners. The third section recounts specific educational praxis through classroom instruction and guided encounters. I discuss symbiotic concerns and questions as they arise in each section.

Open Access
In: Critical Perspectives on Interreligious Education
In: The Theology of Amos Yong and the New Face of Pentecostal Scholarship
Author:

Abstract

In this last in a series of discussions between Tony Moon and the author regarding Pentecostal theology of religions in Bishop King, emphasis is on the core lesson of the conversation and its positive application. It gives brief attention to demonstrating the verity and viability of an optimistic approach contra supposed detractions and oppositions. It concludes that the example of King, and of others, such as Charles Parham and George Britt, indicates there is a historical and theological basis in Classical Pentecostalism for developing a contemporary inclusivist Christian theology of religions from a Pentecostal perspective.

In: Journal of Pentecostal Theology
Author:

Abstract

This article is a response to Tony Moon's scholarly charge that this author has overstated his case regarding Bishop J. H. King's Pentecostal theology of religions. Dr Moon urges a more moderate move, but I respectfully argue that he is missing my point regarding King's theology of religions as at its core characterized by optimism, that is, by a positive and balanced but non-dogmatic sense of hopefulness.

In: Journal of Pentecostal Theology
Author:

Abstract

Tony Richie contends that Bishop J.H. King and a close circle of comrades and colleagues, influential in early Pentecostalism as leading administrators, educators, thinkers, and writers, and including G.F. Taylor and A.A. Boddy, exhibited various levels of (what today is known as) inclusivism regarding Christian theology of religions. He suggests this striking discovery has significant import for the developing field of Pentecostal theology of religions. However, as Tony Moon has rightly pointed out, King did not present non-Christian religions as direct divine instruments or agents of Christ's atonement benefits. Richie agrees with Moon that King primarily encourages hope for some of the humanly unevangelized. Yet Richie, in agreement with Veli-Matti Kärkkäinen, also argues that King's thought can be particularly complex. King's complexity especially shows in his perception of the trans-historical 'essential Christ' and 'religion of Christ'. Thus, Richie persistently suggests that at least King, but probably Taylor too, holds out a well-grounded but cautiously guarded optimism, not so much on world religions per se, as in the boundless Christ and an unbounded—but not boundary-less—religion firmly and forever rooted in the revelation of and redemption in the Lord Jesus Christ.

In: Journal of Pentecostal Theology
Author:

Abstract

The author argues that the current escalation of interfaith conflict, frequently leading to violence, presents an urgent demand for responsible entry into interreligious dialogue by Pentecostals. However, Pentecostal participation in dialogue must be in a manner faithful to the movement's firmly established beliefs and values. This essay describes Pentecostalism's traditional practice of Spirit-enlivened testimony as a model with familiarity and specificity for Pentecostal adherents that may be effective for broader contexts beyond the movement itself. Testimony, therefore, supplies maturing Pentecostalism, mindful of the dilemma threatening global and local stability and security, with a paradigm for a distinctive approach to interreligious dialogue, a paradigm that is both consistent with Pentecostal heritage and that creatively meets contemporary needs.

In: Journal of Pentecostal Theology
In: Pneuma