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Author: Trude Dijkstra
This book discusses how Chinese religion and philosophy were represented in printed works produced in the Dutch Republic between 1595 and 1700. By focusing on books, newspapers, learned journals, and pamphlets, Trude Dijkstra sheds new light on the cultural encounter between China and western Europe in the early modern period. Form, content, and material-technical aspects of different media in Dutch and French are analysed, providing novel insights into the ways in which readers could take note of Chinese religion and philosophy. This study thereby demonstrates that there was no singular image of China and its religion and philosophy, but rather a varied array of notions on the subject.
In: Printing and Publishing Chinese Religion and Philosophy in the Dutch Republic, 1595–1700
In: Printing and Publishing Chinese Religion and Philosophy in the Dutch Republic, 1595–1700
In: Printing and Publishing Chinese Religion and Philosophy in the Dutch Republic, 1595–1700
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In: Printing and Publishing Chinese Religion and Philosophy in the Dutch Republic, 1595–1700
In: Printing and Publishing Chinese Religion and Philosophy in the Dutch Republic, 1595–1700
In: Printing and Publishing Chinese Religion and Philosophy in the Dutch Republic, 1595–1700
In: Printing and Publishing Chinese Religion and Philosophy in the Dutch Republic, 1595–1700

This paper concerns the identification of the hitherto unknown printers of the works of Benedictus de Spinoza (1632-77). For centuries the identity of these printers has remained a mystery. The publisher Jan Rieuwertsz, or the printer Christoffel Cunradus, were often mistakenly mentioned as printer of the works of the seventeenth-century Dutch philosopher. These assumptions are incorrect. Despite several studies published in the last decades, the true identity of the printer was still unknown.

In this paper we will describe how we were able to identify Spinoza’s anonymous printers by means of analytical bibliography. The identity of printers can be established by their usage of unique printing types, initials and ornaments. By comparing printing materials of known printers to unidentified samples, anonymous works can be ascribed to a certain printer. In seventeenth-century books a decorated initial is often used to start the text. This initial belongs to a certain printer and by comparing different prints of similar initials in detail, small differences may be found. These differences can be caused by damages of the initial concerned, such as small cracks. If these differences are consistent over different prints, one can ascribe certain works to the same printer.

By such research the Amsterdam-based printers Daniel Bakkamude and Herman Aeltsz can be identified as the printers of the two earliest published works of Spinoza. His most famous works, Tractatus Theologico-politicus and Opera Posthuma (including the Ethica), were printed by another Amsterdam-based printer: Israël de Paull (1632-80).

In: Quaerendo