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In: Architectures of Poetry
Hungarian Essays on Literature, Art, and Democratic Transition, 1945-1948
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When the Hungarian Marxist philosopher and literary critic György Lukács returned to Hungary from Moscow after World War II, he engaged in a highly active phase of writing and speaking about the democratic culture needed to exorcise the remnants of fascism and to create the conditions for the advance of socialism in Central Europe. His essays of the period, including the influential volume Literature and Democracy, appear here for the first time in English translation. Engaged with questions of realist and modernist world-views in art, the relations of literary history to politics and social history, and the role of cultural intellectuals in public life, these essays offer a new look at one of the most influential Marxist thinkers of the twentieth century.
In: The Culture of People's Democracy
In: The Culture of People's Democracy
In: The Culture of People's Democracy
In: The Culture of People's Democracy
In: The Culture of People's Democracy
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The image of György Lukács’s work, especially in the English-speaking world, has been limited by the absence of translations of some of the most significant writing. The Lukács Library seeks to fill out the picture of Lukács’s massively productive and diverse writing and to correct the reception of Lukács through the nearly exclusive emphasis of Western Marxism and the New Left on Lukács’s early work. In particular, the Lukács Library translations will offer a much richer view of Lukács’s long-evolving engagement with the changing contexts of modern European culture over the eight decades of his life, with the shifts in the socialist and communist movement, and with the dominant and emerging philosophical paradigms of the twentieth century. The Lukács Library’s major expansion of the corpus of English-language translations of Lukács’s writings will especially train new attention on writings that span Lukács’s advocacy of an anti-fascist cultural front policy, a new democratic popular front following the fall of fascism, and an anti-Stalinist socialist democracy in a global environment of coexistence following the 20th Congress in 1956 in which Khrushschev initiated the post-Stalin thaw. In addition, it will provide new material for understanding the genesis of the major, influential, and much-discussed works that have previously appeared in English translations.
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How is it possible that works of art exist? How do we become receptive aesthetic subjects? The Specificity of the Aesthetic extends these fundamental ontological and phenomenological questions around which Georg Lukács’s theory of art was organised. This late work of aesthetics seeks to solve a puzzle that neither philosophy nor socialist politics was able to: the fundamental ethical question of what individuals and humanity as a whole ought to do. Art offers Lukács the already-existing means through which the damaged edifice of Marxism might be reconstructed on a durable basis on which to rest the philosophy, politics, and ethics of a non-Soviet-style Marxism.