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  • Author or Editor: Ulrich Broich x
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Abstract

The essay intends to show that, after a period of decline since the early 1980s, there has been an outburst of creativity in British theatre in the late 1990s and that the most representative of the young playwrights of this period are those who created the ‘theatre of blood and sperm’. These playwrights put extreme forms of sex and violence on the stage, and yet they do not want just to exploit their shock effect but attempt to demonstrate that, in an age in which reality tends to become more and more virtual, young people try to recover ‘reality’, above all the ‘reality’ of the body, by extreme forms of sex, violence and self-harm.

In: Britain at the Turn of the Twenty-First Century
In: Britain at the Turn of the Twenty-First Century
Author:

Abstract

The essay intends to show that, after a period of decline since the early 1980s, there has been an outburst of creativity in British theatre in the late 1990s and that the most representative of the young playwrights of this period are those who created the ‘theatre of blood and sperm’. These playwrights put extreme forms of sex and violence on the stage, and yet they do not want just to exploit their shock effect but attempt to demonstrate that, in an age in which reality tends to become more and more virtual, young people try to recover ‘reality’, above all the ‘reality’ of the body, by extreme forms of sex, violence and self-harm.

In: Britain at the Turn of the Twenty-First Century
In: Britain at the Turn of the Twenty-First Century
Author:

Abstract

The essay intends to show that, after a period of decline since the early 1980s, there has been an outburst of creativity in British theatre in the late 1990s and that the most representative of the young playwrights of this period are those who created the ‘theatre of blood and sperm’. These playwrights put extreme forms of sex and violence on the stage, and yet they do not want just to exploit their shock effect but attempt to demonstrate that, in an age in which reality tends to become more and more virtual, young people try to recover ‘reality’, above all the ‘reality’ of the body, by extreme forms of sex, violence and self-harm.

In: Britain at the Turn of the Twenty-First Century
In: Poetica
In: Poetica