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Ulrich Riegel

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Ulrich Riegel

Abstract

Daily routine on Sunday is changing. Formerly a day of religious contemplation, Sunday seems to be a day of rest within the family. Does this change in activities done on a typical Sunday imply an end of spiritual quality? To answer this question this paper conceptualizes spirituality as experience of connectedness to some greater reality which is regarded as important and meaningful. Four options are possible concerning this greater reality: a transcendent reality, nature or cosmos, mankind, or the individual’s self. The data has been collected by semi-structured interview and analyzed by qualitative content analysis. 148 individuals did take part in these interviews (57% females, age range: 7 to 59; 64% Catholics and 22% Protestants). The findings point at Sunday spent with family. Further on we could identify activities representing all four types of spirituality. Together these examples point at the conclusion that Sunday still is a special day within the week. Its activities offer spiritual quality, but it is the individual to reassure it.

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Ulrich Riegel

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The Impact of Participatory Learning on Attitude

A Quasi-Experimental Study in German Primary Schools

Ulrich Riegel and Katharina Kindermann

Participatory learning is one way for religious education at school to deal with students’ lack of religious experience. In this paper we analyze the impact of participatory learning on the attitude of students towards church buildings. We engaged 594 third graders (about 8 years old) in German primary schools in an instructional sequence about this building. We assigned students to two groups following different instructional techniques, namely field trips to the local church and multi-sensory methods in the classroom. Both learning environments realized the concept of participatory learning. Before and after the sequence we had all students fill in a questionnaire and answer eight questions from which we infer their attitude towards church buildings. Our results indicate that participatory learning has the power to affect the students’ attitude. However, these changes are independent of the instructional technique.