Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 11 items for

  • Author or Editor: Ute Fendler x
  • Search level: All x
Clear All
Author:

Abstract

Comics play an important role in imagining and constructing futures in the African context. Perceptions of the continent have been dominated by colonial and neoco-lonial discourses, which imply that solutions to problems can only be delivered by specialists from abroad. While there are very few narrative genres on the continent about the future, like utopias or dystopias, there is a growing interest in comics and cartoons that are influenced by super-hero stories in the tradition of Marvel or DC but adapted to African contexts. The construction of positive role models draws on legends and myths to create local super heroes who can save Africa, as in the case of the Lagos based enterprise Comic Republic. In this chapter, I argue that drawing is a gesture in which thinking, imagining and acting are entangled, so that the positive heroes can inspire a free imagination of a utopian world and also incite the readership to follow the models.

Open Access
In: African Futures
Author:

Abstract

Quaseilhas (“Almost Islands”), a theater play written by Afro-Brazilian author Diego Araújo, premiered at Barbalho Fort, Salvador da Bahia (Brazil), in April 2018. The set consists of a three-room wooden shed placed in the courtyard of a historic castle in Salvador da Bahia, designed to contribute to the entanglement of various memories inscribed in time and space: as the spectators can only attend the play in one room at a time, they have only limited access to the overall events of the play which moreover is transmitted in an unknown language, namely Yorúbà. The shed also refers to the stilts built close to the shore, where the majority of the population is of Afro descent. Araújo borrows features from the alárinjó theatrical form, which blends performance, song, dance, projections of clips, and music, drawing the spectators into a vortex of a polyphonous and intermedial process of remembering fragments of the Middle Passage, slavery, and the difficult living conditions of socially marginalized communities. In its aesthetic, the play also refers to Afrofuturism, highlighting how the memory of the past should be the basis for reimagining the future.

Open Access
In: Of Worlds and Artworks
A Relational View on Artistic Practices from Africa and the Diaspora
The present volume brings together contributions which explore artworks – including literature, visual arts, film and performances – as dynamic sites of worlding. It puts emphasis on the processes of creating or doing worlds, implying movement as opposed to the boundary drawing of area studies. From such a processual perspective, Africa is not a delineated area, but emerges in a variety of relations which can reach across the continent, but also the Indian Ocean, the Atlantic or Europe.

Contributors are: Thierry Boudjekeu, Elena Brugioni, Ute Fendler, Sophie Lembcke, Gilbert Ndi Shang, Samuel Ndogo, Duncan Tarrant, Kumari Issur, CJ Odhiambo, Michaela Ott, Peter Simatei, Clarissa Vierke, Chinelo J. Enemuo.
In: Of Worlds and Artworks
In: Of Worlds and Artworks
In: Of Worlds and Artworks
In: Of Worlds and Artworks
In: Of Worlds and Artworks
In: Of Worlds and Artworks
In: Of Worlds and Artworks