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In: The Seventh Book of the Stromateis

Abstract

The sixth chapter of Clement’s Stromateis book four is devoted to the exposition of the Matthean Beatitudes, but other verses from the Sermon on the Mount in Matt 5–7 are also included in this interpretation. Although Clement does not present any other exegesis of the Sermon as a whole, he often refers to it. Not only does he refer to the vast majority of its verses, but the references to the Sermon belong to the most frequently cited or alluded to parts of all the writings referenced by Clement. This essay provides an overview of Clement’s references to the Matthean Sermon and parallels in the other gospels. It points out the surprising thematic correspondence of those passages of the Sermon on the Mount most emphasised by Clement with those passages that, for some reason, are not referenced at all. Their common denominator seems to be human desire: whether desire for an apparent benefit (which is the source of all iniquity and evil), or desire for a real benefit to one’s self, or desire for a relationship with God or for the benefit of other people (i.e. for their deliverance from evil). On the basis of this analysis, this contribution seeks to answer the more general theological question about what Clement means when he says that all human desires should be abandoned.

In: Clement’s Biblical Exegesis
Proceedings of the Second Colloquium on Clement of Alexandria (Olomouc, May 29–31, 2014)
In Clement’s Biblical Exegesis scholars from six countries explore various facets of Clement of Alexandria’s hermeneutical theory and his exegetical practice. Although research on Clement has tended to emphasize his use of philosophical sources, Clement was important not only as a Christian philosopher, but also as a pioneer Christian exegete. His works constitute a crucial link in the tradition of Alexandrian exegesis, but his biblical exegesis has received much less attention than that of Philo or Origen. Topics discussed include how Clement’s methods of allegorical interpretation compare with those of Philo, Origen, and pagan exegetes of Homer, and his readings of particular texts such as Proverbs, the Sermon on the Mount, John 1, 1 John, and the Pauline letters.
In: Clement’s Biblical Exegesis
In: Clement’s Biblical Exegesis
In: Clement’s Biblical Exegesis
In: Clement’s Biblical Exegesis