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In: Ordinary Jerusalem, 1840-1940
In: Ordinary Jerusalem, 1840-1940
In: Ordinary Jerusalem, 1840-1940
In: Ordinary Jerusalem, 1840-1940
In: Ordinary Jerusalem, 1840-1940
Opening New Archives, Revisiting a Global City
In Ordinary Jerusalem, Angelos Dalachanis, Vincent Lemire and thirty-five scholars depict the ordinary history of an extraordinary global city in the late Ottoman and Mandate periods. Utilizing largely unknown archives, they revisit the holy city of three religions, which has often been defined solely as an eternal battlefield and studied exclusively through the prism of geopolitics and religion. At the core of their analysis are topics and issues developed by the European Research Council-funded project “Opening Jerusalem Archives: For a Connected History of Citadinité in the Holy City, 1840–1940.” Drawn from the French vocabulary of geography and urban sociology, the concept of citadinité describes the dynamic identity relationship a city’s inhabitants develop with each other and with their urban environment.
The Open Jerusalem Book Series at Brill will be dedicated to discovering, revealing and connecting different archives and sources in order to investigate the ordinary, entangled history of a global city through the lens of the concept of urban citizenship (citadinité). Citadinité is for a city what nationality is for a country and materializes itself in institutions, actors and practices. The project provides a bottom–up history of Jerusalem, a perspective that has been neglected by historians of the city, who have been generally preoccupied with ideological and geostrategic issues. This history is also a connected one because, within a complex documentary archipelago, the researchers seek points of contact revealing the exchanges, interactions, conflicts and, at times, hybridizations between different populations and traditions. The Series will go even beyond the chronological limits of the project. Its ambition is to cover Jerusalem’s history during the entire 19th and 20th centuries. The Series will publish important original monographs and translated texts, which will be the outcome of extensive research at the different archives of Jerusalem. These works will not be published only in the traditional print form but also in Open Access, in full or in part, in order to comply with the ERC guidelines for dissemination of research results.

Vincent Lemire is Associate Professor at Gustave Eiffel University and Director at the French Research Centre in Jerusalem and Angelos Dalachanis is Researcher at the French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS), Institute of Early Modern and Modern History (IHMC-UMR8066).
The Story of an Ethiopian Manuscript Found in Jerusalem (1904)
Around 1900 the small Ethiopian community in Jerusalem found itself in a desperate struggle with the Copts over the Dayr al-Sultan monastery located on the roof of the Holy Sepulchre. Based on a profoundly researched, impassioned and multifaceted exploration of a forgotten manuscript, this book abandons the standard majority discourse and approaches the history of Jerusalem through the lens of a community typically considered marginal. It illuminates the political, religious and diplomatic affairs that exercised the city, and guides the reader on a fascinating journey from the Ethiopian highlands to the Holy Sepulchre, passing through the Ottoman palaces in Istanbul.

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In: The Monk on the Roof