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We live in a globalized world in which a person in Burkina Faso can identify with Star Wars heroes, and in which a New York trader drinks the same Starbucks coffee as his Taiwanese counterpart. How are individuals socialized in Rome, Bombay, and Tokyo? To answer this question, a unique investigation has been carried out using two scales of analysis usually tackled separately by global studies: the scale of the cosmopolitan world and its global narratives, imaginaries, iconographies; as well as the scale of everyday life and socialization to otherness. This two-fold perspective constitutes the innovative approach of this volume that endeavors to address an operationalization of the cosmopolitan perspective and reacts to current debates and new research findings.

With a Foreword by Natan Sznaider.

This book was first published in 2016 as Pluriel et commun. Sociologie d'un monde cosmopolite by Les Presses de Sciences Po, Paris.

Other editions: the book is also published in Italian as Plurale e comune. Sociologia di un mondo cosmopolita by Morlacchi editore, Perugia, 2018; and in Portuguese as Plural e comum. Sociologia de um mundo cosmopolita by Edições Sesc, Sao Paulo, 2018.

*Plural and Shared: The Sociology of a Cosmopolitan World is now available in paperback for individual customers.
In: Critical Perspectives on International Education
In: Critical Perspectives on International Education
In: Cosmopolitanism in Hard Times
Series Editors: Vincenzo Cicchelli and Sylvie Octobre
Specialists of adolescence and youth tend to consider these life stages as valuable barometers of social change. Indeed, new trends in society can be observed through the prism of young people who today find themselves under the spotlight as never before. At the same time, all over the planet, tremendous changes in everyday life can be witnessed currently. The main reason for a book series focused on adolescence and youth from an international perspective is due to the lack of knowledge and understanding of the emergence of transnational shared practices, values, norms, behaviors, cultures and patterns among young people all over the globe.

The aim of this book series is to be a forum for discussion and exchanges, a space for intellectual creativity on all questions relating to youth in a globalizing world. It also provides a valuable and much-needed crucible for comparative studies on youth from an international perspective. Its spirit is to be open to new suggestions coming from research in the social sciences. From an epistemological stance, what kind of concepts do sociologists of youth need in order to understand changes? Are classical sociological concepts on youth still useful and relevant? What kind of perspectives could be more suitable?

Because this book series is situated within a mainstream research framework, we welcome original leading works written in a manner that is accessible to a wider audience.

For editorial queries and proposals, please contact the series editors Vincenzo Cicchelli and Sylvie Octobre.

Submissions of an interdisciplinary nature are strongly encouraged.

Special proposal criteria
All proposals must include the following. If a proposal lacks any of these elements, it will be returned.
1) Table of contents
2) Prospectus
3) One-page summary of each chapter
4) Working bibliography

*A paperback edition of select titles in the series, for individual purchase only, will be released approximately 12 months after publication of the hardcover edition.

Abstract

Conspiracy theories have always held a certain appeal for young people. In our survey, a substantial number of students believed that the attacks of 11 September 2001 were sponsored by the cia. Among the explanatory factors of the conspiracy mentality, socio-economic determinants as well as identity-related components play an important role. Moreover, this attraction for conspiracy theories is articulated with a strong mistrust of the media. This mistrust is fueled by two major and interconnected changes linked to the emergence and domination of social media: the establishment of a temporal regime of immediacy and the formation of cognitive oligopolies. 9% of students are attracted to both conspiracy theories and a generalised defiance involving active participation in the dissemination of Daesh videos: they display what we propose to call “informational radicalism”.

In: Radical Thought among the Young: A Survey of French Lycée Students

Abstract

Conspiracy theories have always held a certain appeal for young people. In our survey, a substantial number of students believed that the attacks of 11 September 2001 were sponsored by the cia. Among the explanatory factors of the conspiracy mentality, socio-economic determinants as well as identity-related components play an important role. Moreover, this attraction for conspiracy theories is articulated with a strong mistrust of the media. This mistrust is fueled by two major and interconnected changes linked to the emergence and domination of social media: the establishment of a temporal regime of immediacy and the formation of cognitive oligopolies. 9% of students are attracted to both conspiracy theories and a generalised defiance involving active participation in the dissemination of Daesh videos: they display what we propose to call “informational radicalism”.

In: Radical Thought among the Young: A Survey of French Lycée Students

Youth and Globalization is an academic forum for discussion and exchanges, a space for intellectual creativity on all questions relating to youth in a globalizing world. Its aim is to provide an innovative understanding of youth studies in a global context based on multiscalar, multilevel, multisite, and multidisciplinary approaches. Young people both are affected by and are the actors of the globalization of everyday life. Drawing on both theoretical and empirical research, the journal explores how young people relate to globality and its outcomes.

To open this discussion, the Journal starts with an issue devoted to understanding the global generation through the lenses of the cosmopolitan approach. It discusses four major criticisms and provides a counter position to. In the first case, cosmopolitanism is too often considered as a natural consequence of globalization, while in the second as being too ethnocentric. In the third case, cosmopolitanism has been assimilated to the ideology of contemporary global capitalism and in the fourth case it is mocked as a mere utopia. The papers gathered here investigate values, norms, behaviors and practices related to esthetic, cultural, ethic and political cosmopolitanisms.

In: Youth and Globalization