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Abstract

The reader plays an active role in the reception of Tobias Tank’s book Hier öffnen [‘Open Here’], but in such a way that it is limited to a single act. The ‘reading process’, or rather, the reception, results in the destruction of the body of the book. The further the reader progresses through the book, the more he or she destroys it. In the end, nothing remains other than what might be left after opening a small, zip-fastened mail parcel.

In: Refresh the Book
In: Refresh the Book

Abstract

The perception of the book as an architectural construction is well-known. For a long time, books have been viewed as an exhibition space, or have even replaced it. In such a context, the book is often no longer a mere companion to an exhibition, as a catalogue, but it can function as a space of display itself. Since the famous exhibition by Seth Siegelaub in 1969 entitled ‘January 5 to 31, 1969’, accompanied by the publication of his Xerox-Book, artists have turned to the spaces of books not only to exhibit there, but also to blur differences between spaces and genres. Mauricio Nannucci, for example, published the catalogue Nothing Is Original as a multiple, and as such it became an additional exhibit in his exhibition, while Karin Sander ‘transcribed’ the gallery space into a three-volume work comprising rubbings of the space’s walls, floor and ceiling. This article provides an overview of artists’ increasing use of books as an exhibition space, along with examining the diverse interrelations between the spaces of books and those of sites and context.

In: Refresh the Book
In: Refresh the Book
In: Refresh the Book
On the Hybrid Nature of the Book in the Age of Electronic Publishing
Refresh the Book contains reflections on the multimodal nature of the book, focusing on its changing perception, functions, forms, and potential in the digital age. Offering an overview of key concepts and approaches, such as liberature, technotexts, and bookishness, this volume of essays addresses the specificity of the printed book as a complex cultural phenomenon. It discusses diverse forms of representation and expression, both in literary and non-literary texts, as well as in artist’s books. Of special interest are these aspects of the book which resist remediation into the digital form. Finally, the volume contains an extensive section devoted to artistic practice as research, discussing the book as the synthesis of the arts, and site for performative aesthetic activity.

Christin Barbarino, Katarzyna Bazarnik, Christoph Bläsi, Sarah Bodman, Zenon Fajfer, Annette Gilbert, Susanne Gramatzki, Mareike Herbstreit, Viola Hildebrand-Schat, Thomas Hvid Kromann, Monika Jäger, Eva Linhart, Bettina Lockemann, Patrizia Meinert, Bernhard Metz, Sebastian Schmideler, Monika Schmitz-Emans, Christoph Benjamin Schulz, usus (Uta Schneider & Ulrike Stoltz), Anne Thurmann-Jajes, Sakine Weikert, Gabriele Wix