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Abstract

In this commentary piece I first discuss the work of Dorothea Hancock () on an inclusive education approach in Mongolia. I also consider the implications for inclusive education of character and moral education in Taiwan (Yen-Hsin Chen, ). Finally I consider the influence of early identification of autism for inclusive education in Brazil (Cleonice Alves Bosa, Simone Steyer and Silvia Helena Koller, ).

In: Moving towards Inclusive Education
Diverse National Engagements with Paradoxes of Policy and Practice
Moving towards Inclusive Education: Diverse National Engagements with Paradoxes of Policy and Practice presents perspectives from Asia-Pacific and Europe that have seldom been heard in international debates. While there may be global consensus around United Nations' goals for inclusion in education, each country's cultural and religious understandings shape national views regarding the priorities for inclusion. Some countries focus on disability, while others bring in concerns about culture, ethnicity, language, gender and/or sexuality. In this fascinating collection, senior commentators explore the ethical difficulties as well as hopes for a more inclusive education in their countries, raising questions of interest for educators, policy-makers and all who support the work of inclusive education.

Contributors are: Vishalache Balakrishnan, Bayarmaa Bazarsuren, Cleonice Alves Bosa, Yen-Hsin Chen, Lise Claiborne, Tim Corcoran, Bronwyn Davies, Carol Hamilton, Dorothea W. Hancock, Mashrur Imtiaz, Maria Kecskemeti, Silvia Helena Koller, Yvonne Leeman, Sonja Macfarlane, Roger Moltzen, Sikder Monoare Murshed, Sanjaabadam Sid, Simone Steyer, Eugeniusz Świtała, Wiel Veugelers, and Ben Whitburn.
In: Moving towards Inclusive Education

Abstract

The introduction to this book gives a detailed overview of each chapter in this collection, highlighting the great diversity of approaches to inclusive education being undertaken around the world today. International literature around diversity and inclusive practice in education has been dominated by views from western Europe and the US. Several countries represented in this volume have had little chance to be heard in international literature. While much contemporary debate around inclusive education has seen movement away from the focus on ‘mainstreaming’ of students seen as having ‘special’ needs outside those expected of ‘normal’ students, the distinction between mainstreaming and more inclusive education is not universally embraced. Each country has its own historical experiences of understanding and responding to differences among its people. While there appears to be a broad international consensus, supported by the United Nations, around the notion that education should be inclusive of all students, there are many varying understandings of what this means in practice. Referring to work of commentators such as Roger Slee, this chapter shows ways that the diverse countries in this volume have common goals as well as specific understandings grounded in a variety of cultural understandings that influence policies and their implementation. We discuss the ways that various concerns raised in this volume are positioned in international debates around inclusive education, defined in its broadest sense to include concerns around disability, gender, sexuality, ethnicity, religion and beyond.

In: Moving towards Inclusive Education
In: Moving towards Inclusive Education
In: Moving towards Inclusive Education
In: Moving towards Inclusive Education
In: Realising Innovative Partnerships in Educational Research