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One might be surprised, astonished or indignant seeing men and women prostrating themselves in front of other men and other women. Or one might feel it is right to bow down before God, Allah, the saints, the Holy Virgin or the gods. Kings into Gods: How Prostration Shaped Eurasian Civilizations investigates the reasons why men prostrate themselves before deities or before powerful men. Through an in-depth historical and cultural analysis, this book highlights the connection between rituality and royalty within the Eurasian civilizations. The narrative and iconic documentation gathered and analyzed concerns the Greek and Roman world, the Mongolian civilization during the Middle Ages, the Hindu and Chinese civilizations, the Islamic civilization in India in the fourteenth century, the Mughal civilization and European civilization in the late Middle Ages. The different forms of the rituals in the courts of kings and emperors are tightly connected with the concept of royalty. The prostration is an act of humiliation of defeated enemies, a means to establish a abysmal distance between powerful elite and the people, a way of creating hierarchies within the elite itself.
Global Society and Human Rights tries to grasp and reconstruct the processes of global unification and the shaping of a common feeling of humanity: the conviction, in different cultural contexts, of the unity of mankind and the existence of inalienable human rights. Contrary to the past, the quest for the unity of mankind does not imply the denial of differences; on the contrary, it brings to light the common traits of the social and political organizations from which the potential recognition and the assertion of individual differences arise.
The basic claim set forth in this book is that global society could be the context for the actual assertion of human rights.
In: Kings into Gods
In: Kings into Gods
In: Kings into Gods
In: Kings into Gods
In: Kings into Gods
In: Kings into Gods
In: Kings into Gods
In: Kings into Gods