Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 8 of 8 items for

  • Author or Editor: Vladimir Glomb x
  • Search level: All x
Clear All
Author: Vladimír Glomb

Abstract

Yulgok Yi I was one the most significant thinkers of 16th-century Korean Confucianism and his ideas deeply influenced the development of Korean Confucian academies. His plans and practical steps concerning the Confucian academies—their purpose, students, shrines, and economic management—shows that there were shifting patterns in the Korean model of the Confucian academy in his time and gives us an insight into both private and court debates about the possible shape and management of Korean academies. Yulgok’s main contributions concerning academy rules were consistent rules for the admission of students (stressing broad access to academy education), fixed patterns for academy decision-making (often based on collective decisions), and a detailed system of punitive measures intended to maintain discipline among the students. In his plans for Munhŏn Academy Yulgok combined all three of Zhu Xi’s crucial concepts for governing local society (Confucian academy, community compact, community granary) into single model and he was one of the first Korean thinkers who shaped his private study hall according to the model of the Confucian academy.

In: Confucian Academies in East Asia
Author: Vladimír Glomb

Abstract

Yulgok Yi I was one the most significant thinkers of 16th-century Korean Confucianism and his ideas deeply influenced the development of Korean Confucian academies. His plans and practical steps concerning the Confucian academies—their purpose, students, shrines, and economic management—shows that there were shifting patterns in the Korean model of the Confucian academy in his time and gives us an insight into both private and court debates about the possible shape and management of Korean academies. Yulgok’s main contributions concerning academy rules were consistent rules for the admission of students (stressing broad access to academy education), fixed patterns for academy decision-making (often based on collective decisions), and a detailed system of punitive measures intended to maintain discipline among the students. In his plans for Munhŏn Academy Yulgok combined all three of Zhu Xi’s crucial concepts for governing local society (Confucian academy, community compact, community granary) into single model and he was one of the first Korean thinkers who shaped his private study hall according to the model of the Confucian academy.

In: Confucian Academies in East Asia
The Lives and Legacy of Kim Sisŭp (1435–1493) offers an account of the most extraordinary figure of Korean literature and intellectual history. The present work narrates the fascinating story of a prodigious child, acclaimed poet, author of the first Korean novel, Buddhist monk, model subject, Confucian recluse and Daoist master. No other Chosŏn scholar or writer has been venerated in both Confucian shrines and Buddhist temples, had his works widely read in Tokugawa Japan and became an integral part of the North Korean literary canon.
The nine studies and further materials presented in this volume provide a detailed look on the various aspects of Kim Sisŭp’s life and work as well as a reflection of both traditional and modern narratives surrounding his legacy. Contributors are: Vladimír Glomb, Gregory N. Evon, Dennis Wuerthner, Barbara Wall, Kim Daeyeol, Miriam Löwensteinová, Anastasia A. Guryeva, Sixiang Wang, and Diana Yüksel.

Abstract

Confucian academies in post-liberation North Korea became subject of a complex political and intellectual debate motivated by the needs of the new regime to reevaluate the Korean past according to the ideological framework of Marxism-Leninism. Confucian academies were designated as institutions belonging to the past feudal order and as such their traditional functioning was severed and liquidated. On the other hand they were to a certain degree recognized as cultural relics belonging to the people of the DPRK and North Korean scholars devoted considerable effort to describe the role of Confucian academies within the traditional Korean society. The present study analyzes North Korean discursive strategies concerning Confucian academies during the 1950s and 1960s. It focuses on both popular and academic depictions of these educational, religious, and political institutions, including the most recent developments in the field.

In: Confucian Academies in East Asia

Abstract

Confucian academies in post-liberation North Korea became subject of a complex political and intellectual debate motivated by the needs of the new regime to reevaluate the Korean past according to the ideological framework of Marxism-Leninism. Confucian academies were designated as institutions belonging to the past feudal order and as such their traditional functioning was severed and liquidated. On the other hand they were to a certain degree recognized as cultural relics belonging to the people of the DPRK and North Korean scholars devoted considerable effort to describe the role of Confucian academies within the traditional Korean society. The present study analyzes North Korean discursive strategies concerning Confucian academies during the 1950s and 1960s. It focuses on both popular and academic depictions of these educational, religious, and political institutions, including the most recent developments in the field.

In: Confucian Academies in East Asia
In: Confucian Academies in East Asia
In: Confucian Academies in East Asia
The fifteen studies presented inConfucian Academies in East Asia offer insight into the history and legacy of these unique institutions of knowledge and education. The contributions analyze origins, spread and development of Confucian academies across China, Korea, Vietnam, and Japan from multiple perspectives. This edited volume is one of the first attempts to understand Confucian academies as a complex transnational, intellectual, and cultural phenomena that played an essential role in various areas of East Asian education, philosophy, religious practice, local economy, print industry, and even archery. The broad chronological range of essays allows it to demonstrate the role of Confucian academies as highly adaptable and active agents of cultural and intellectual change since the eighth century until today. An indispensable handbook for studies of Confucian culture and institutions since the eighth century until the present.

Contributors are: Chien Iching, Chung Soon-woo, Deng Hongbo, Martin Gehlmann, Vladimír Glomb, Lan Jun, Lee Byoung-Hoon, Eun-Jeung Lee, Thomas H.C. Lee, Margaret Dorothea Mehl, Steven B. Miles, Hoyt Cleveland Tillman, Nguyễn Tuấn-Cường, Linda Walton and Minamizawa Yoshihiko.