Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 164 items for

  • Author or Editor: Walter Bernhart x
  • Search level: All x
Clear All
In: Meaningful Absence Across Arts and Media
Editor: Walter Bernhart
The book series Studies in Intermediality, launched in 2006, is devoted to scholarly research in the field of Intermediality Studies and, thus, in the broadest sense, addresses all phenomena involving more than one communicative medium. More specifically, it concerns itself with the wide range of relationships established among the various media and investigates how concepts of a more general character find diversified manifestations and reflections in the different media.
Studies in Intermediality publishes, peer-reviewed, theme-oriented volumes and monographs, documenting and critically assessing the scope, theory, methodology, and the disciplinary and institutional dimensions and prospects of Intermediality Studies on an international scale.

For specific information on the editing of SIM volumes and style information please visit the SIM Style Guide.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Masja Horn.
Author: Walter Bernhart

Abstract

The documentary film Night Mail, propagating the services of the British General Post Office in the 1930s, reflects the political ideas, typical of the period, of increased democratisation and a collective work ethic. At the same time, it reflects those advanced aesthetic ideas of the period that favoured a public function of art and saw art works as products of collaborative creative activity by artists from different media, with film taking a leading role in the coaction. The g.p.o. Film Unit was able to engage W.H. Auden and Benjamin Britten as contributors to the formation of Night Mail. This paper argues that their cooperative efforts turned the film into a unique case of what it calls a “collaborative Gesamtkunstwerk” showing a particularly close interaction of picture, words and music, and analyses the effects which the closeness of interaction has on the working of the participating media.

In: Music, Narrative and the Moving Image
In: Immersion and Distance
Author: Walter Bernhart

Abstract

The documentary film Night Mail, propagating the services of the British General Post Office in the 1930s, reflects the political ideas, typical of the period, of increased democratisation and a collective work ethic. At the same time, it reflects those advanced aesthetic ideas of the period that favoured a public function of art and saw art works as products of collaborative creative activity by artists from different media, with film taking a leading role in the coaction. The g.p.o. Film Unit was able to engage W.H. Auden and Benjamin Britten as contributors to the formation of Night Mail. This paper argues that their cooperative efforts turned the film into a unique case of what it calls a “collaborative Gesamtkunstwerk” showing a particularly close interaction of picture, words and music, and analyses the effects which the closeness of interaction has on the working of the participating media.

In: Music, Narrative and the Moving Image
In: A Breath of Fresh Eyre
In: Word and Music Studies: Essays on Performativity and on Surveying the Field
In: Immersion and Distance
In: Description in Literature and Other Media