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Since its origin in the nineteenth century, the borders of the discipline of art history have been fluid. Art history has absorbed theories and methods from other disciplines such as history, philosophy, anthropology, and, more recently, film and gender studies; conversely, it has had an impact on these and other disciplines, its relevance confirmed by the visual turn newly evident throughout the humanities. The history of art history itself reflects trends in intellectual history, and the art historian's intellectual and cultural formation determines what counts as an art historical object, and how such objects are theorized and interpreted. The interpretation of a work of art must therefore activate the self-reflexive capacity of art historical inquiry. Brill’s Studies on Art, Art History, and Intellectual History is dedicated to the study of historical and contemporary works of art, in ways that reflect on the history of art, its theories and methods, and its relation to the cultural milieux in which art historians operate.

Series Editor: Walter Melion, Emory University
Brill Acquisitions Editor: Arjan van Dijk

Since its origin in the nineteenth century, the borders of the discipline of art history have been fluid. Art history has absorbed theories and methods from other disciplines such as history, philosophy, anthropology, and, more recently, film and gender studies; conversely, it has had an impact on these and other disciplines, its relevance confirmed by the visual turn newly evident throughout the humanities. The history of art history itself reflects trends in intellectual history, and the art historian's intellectual and cultural formation determines what counts as an art historical object, and how such objects are theorized and interpreted. The interpretation of a work of art must therefore activate the self-reflexive capacity of art historical inquiry. Brill’s Studies on Art, Art History, and Intellectual History is dedicated to the study of historical and contemporary works of art, in ways that reflect on the history of art, its theories and methods, and its relation to the cultural milieux in which art historians operate.

Series Editor: Walter Melion, Emory University
Brill Acquisitions Editor: Arjan van Dijk
Embodying Meaning and Emotion
Personification, or prosopopeia, the rhetorical figure by which something not human is given a human identity or ‘face’, is readily discernible in early modern texts and images, but the figure’s cognitive form and function, its rhetorical and pictorial effects, have rarely elicited sustained scholarly attention. The aim of this volume is to formulate an alternative account of personification, to demonstrate the ingenuity with which this multifaceted device was utilized by late medieval and early modern authors and artists in Italy, France, England, Scotland, and the Low Countries. Personification is susceptible to an approach that balances semiotic analysis, focusing on meaning effects, and phenomenological analysis, focusing on presence effects produced through bodily performance. This dual approach foregrounds the full scope of prosopopoeic discourse—not just the what, but also the how, not only the signified, but also the signifier.
In: Pieter Bruegel the Elder and Religion
In: Image and Incarnation