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Abstract

From one perspective the Six-Day War would have been the most natural choice since the State of Israel became the de facto custodian of the scrolls with the capture of East Jerusalem and the Palestine Archaeological Museum in June 1967. It was some time before those working on the scrolls fully adjusted to the changes in access and oversight brought about by this transition from Jordanian to Israeli control. On the other hand, 1960 was also a logical choice because during this year the Rockefeller money on which the Palestine Archaeological Museum (PAM) and the Cave 4 Team had been so dependent was discontinued, and permission to distribute the scrolls to supporting institutions as a fund-raising tool, was rescinded by the government of Jordan. In the end it was simply space that dictated the choice.

In: The Dead Sea Scrolls, A Full History

Abstract

This chapter presents timeline of events related to the Dead Sea Scrolls through 1960. In 1948, at the end of January, Sukenik receives a letter from Anton Kiraz saying that he wants to show him more scrolls. During 1953, June De Contensen leaves Jerusalem. In 1956, 3 January, Muhammad arrives in Manchester with the second part of the Copper Scroll.

In: The Dead Sea Scrolls, A Full History

Abstract

This chapter presents a list of abbreviations of the book titled The Dead Sea Scrolls. The book offers a more complete account of the discovery of the scrolls and their history over the past 60 years since the first scrolls were discovered in a cave near the Dead Sea. The entries are arranged in alphabetical order.

In: The Dead Sea Scrolls, A Full History

Abstract

This front matter section of the book titled The Dead Sea Scrolls: A Full History contains the acknowledgements, table of contents, introduction, and prologue. The Dead Sea Scrolls-fascinating tales of their discovery, reconstruction, decipherment, and publication. These are the themes of the book, pursued, as much as possible, through the words of the men who were there, the men who found scrolls or bought them from the Bedouin, who spent long tedious months and years piecing together the giant incomplete jigsaw puzzle of scroll fragments, and decades preparing them for publication. In the book the author brings together new interviews with scholars and others associated with the Dead Sea Scrolls and many personal letters and other archival documents never made public until now.

In: The Dead Sea Scrolls, A Full History

Abstract

This section contains endnotes from chapters 1 to 13. It provides an outlines on Eusebius, Ecclesiastical History 6:16:l and a report from the tenth century Karaite Joseph Kirkisani (also known as Al-Qirqisani) of Babylonia. The report recurs in the twelfth century.

In: The Dead Sea Scrolls, A Full History

Abstract

This section of the book titled The Dead Sea Scrolls deals with the purchase of antiquities by the Palestine Archaeological Museum. It includes the date, name of the seller of the antiquities, amount paid to the seller, explanation of expenditures and cave number. The book offers a more complete account of the discovery of the scrolls and their history over the past 60 years since the first scrolls were discovered in a cave near the Dead Sea.

In: The Dead Sea Scrolls, A Full History

Abstract

This section of the book contains glossary of the book titled The Dead Sea Scrolls. The book offers a more complete account of the discovery of the scrolls and their history over the past 60 years since the first scrolls were discovered in a cave near the Dead Sea. The entries are arranged in alphabetical order from A to M.

In: The Dead Sea Scrolls, A Full History

Abstract

This index presents a list of terms of the book titled The Dead Sea Scrolls. The book offers a more complete account of the discovery of the scrolls and their history over the past 60 years since the first scrolls were discovered in a cave near the Dead Sea. The entries are arranged in alphabetical order.

In: The Dead Sea Scrolls, A Full History
Studies in Hebrew Bible, Septuagint, and Dead Sea Scrolls in Honor of Emanuel Tov
This volume honors the lifetime of scholarly contribution and leadership of Professor Emanuel Tov, Judah L. Magnes professor of Bible at the Department of Bible, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Colleagues from all over the world have contributed significant studies in the three areas of Tov’s primary interest and expertise: the Hebrew Bible, its Greek translations, and the Dead Sea Scrolls.
This Festschrift is a fitting tribute to one of the generation’s leading scholars, whose dedicated efforts as editor-in-chief have brought about the complete publication of the Dead Sea Scrolls.