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William S. Brockman

Newspapers, pamphlets, handbills and other printed ephemera pervade Joyce’s letters as well as his works of fiction. He subscribed to Irish newspapers and to newspaper clipping services. As Joyce’s works were published, he became increasingly attuned to press coverage, either keeping stories clipped from the newspapers or sending them as enclosures in his letters. One of his main means of communication with supporters was via clippings. Of interest here is Joyce’s use of the newspaper after it had served its function as carrier of the latest information. Examples of clippings sent to Ezra Pound and to Harriet Weaver document his fascination with the treatment he was receiving in the press and his ability to turn the press’s interest in him to his advantage. In his works, a newspaper clipping forms part of the opening scene of “A Painful Case”, three clippings are enumerated in the “Ithaca” episode of Ulysses and remnants of press notices appear in Finnegans Wake. Clippings form part of the multitude of cultural references that permeate Joyce’s works. Extracting them from their original sources, Joyce puts them to a variety of uses and offers them to be viewed from multiple perspectives.

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Edited by William S. Brockman, Tekla Mecsnóber and Sabrina Alonso

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Publishing in Joyce's Ulysses

Newspapers, Advertising and Printing

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Edited by William Brockman, Tekla Mecsnóber and Sabrina Alonso

Appearing in an era of rapid change in the printing and publishing industries, James Joyce’s Ulysses exploited and exemplified those industries to the degree that the book can be seen as a virtual museum of 1904 media. Publishing in Joyce's “Ulysses”: Newspapers, Advertising and Printing, edited by William S. Brockman, Tekla Mecsnóber and Sabrina Alonso, gathers twelve essays by Joyce scholars exploring facets of those trades that pervade the substance of the book. Essays explore the book’s incorporation of mass-market weekly magazines, contemporary advertising slogans, newspaper clippings, the “Aeolus” episode’s printing office and the varied typographic styles of successive editions of Ulysses. Placing Joyce’s work in its historical milieu, the collection offers a fresh perspective on modern print culture.

Contributors are: Sabrina Alonso, Harald Beck, William S. Brockman, Elisabetta d'Erme, Judith Harrington, Matthew Hayward, Sangam MacDuff, Tekla Mecsnóber, Tamara Radak, Fritz Senn, David Spurr, Jolanta Wawrzycka.