Search Results

Author: William Granara

Abstract

The theme of "Al-Andalus" has featured prominently in the Arabic novel from the novel's earliest stages to its most recent diverse and complex maturation. This article examines the connections between the temporal and spatial signi fications of Al-Andalus and how they function within three Arabic novels, from the historical/romantic, social realist, and modernist genres. It argues that writing Al-Andalus entails more than nostalgia for a glorious past. These novelists take a critical view of contemporary society and rework Al-Andalus as a blueprint for a more hopeful future. That is, the historical consciousness of the "Andalusian" novel re flects on, explains, and critiques the current state of affairs in the Arab world. More generally, this study reiterates the homologous relationship between the political and intellectual trajectory of modern Arabic thought, and here the emphasis is on Arab Nationalism, and the development of the Arabic novel.

In: Journal of Arabic Literature
Author: William Granara

Abstract

This essay looks at acts of hospitality and revenge as constituent elements of a broad social code in rural Egyptian narratives. By looking at five stories in particular, I argue that hospitality and revenge work in complementarity, and that they often trespass and blur each other’s social and literary borders, creating ambiguity and complexity in the stories. The traditional rules that govern hospitality are at times challenged or inverted by hostile intentions, and revenge may be exacted for common or personal well-being. Also, the Nile River, richly symbolic of Egyptian history and identity, plays a vital role in situating the self, in all its pristine, bifurcated, and sullied forms.

In: Journal of Arabic Literature
In: The Thousand and One Nights: Sources and Transformations in Literature, Art, and Science
The Thousand and One Nights does not fall into a scholarly canon or into the category of popular literature. It takes its place within a middle literature that circulated widely in medieval times. The Nights gradually entered world literature through the great novels of the day and through music, cinema and other art forms. Material inspired by the Nights has continued to emerge from many different countries, periods, disciplines and languages, and the scope of the Nights has continued to widen, making the collection a universal work from every point of view. The essays in this volume scrutinize the expanse of sources for this monumental work of Arabic literature and follow the trajectory of the Nights’ texts, the creative, scholarly commentaries, artistic encounters and relations to science.

Contributors: Ibrahim Akel, Rasoul Aliakbari, Daniel Behar, Aboubakr Chraïbi, Anne E. Duggan, William Granara, Rafika Hammoudi, Dominique Jullien, Abdelfattah Kilito, Magdalena Kubarek, Michael James Lundell, Ulrich Marzolph, Adam Mestyan, Eyüp Özveren, Marina Paino, Daniela Potenza, Arafat Abdur Razzaque, Ahmed Saidy, Johannes Thomann and Ilaria Vitali.