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William K. Kay

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William K. Kay

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William K. Kay

This article discusses the life and work of the Roman Catholic Charismatic Peter Hocken. It shows how, over many publications and in a series of writings directed both to Catholics and to the wider Christian world, he has constructed a theological understanding of the outpouring of the Spirit in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. The purpose of the Spirit in denominational and nondenominational streams turns on the key role of Messianic Jews and is essentially eschatological and ecumenical as it prepares for the return of Christ. The article also includes a list of Hocken’s publications on Pentecostalism, charismatic renewal, and Israel.

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William K Kay

This essay presents an account of the theological ideas that led to the formation of apostolic networks in Britain in the 1970s. It takes note of the function of theology as a driver of ecclesiastical innovation and offers the thesis that, while theology provides ideas and arguments, society is the receptacle into which these ideas are poured. Consequently, similar ideas are expressed in different social forms as society changes. The essay comments upon changes within apostolic networks in the last fifteen years, notes the appearance of metanetworks, and highlights the emergence of networks within denominational settings.

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William K. Kay

Abstract

Karl Popper argued that science proceeds not by induction but by offering explanatory theories that scientists then attempt to falsify. What cannot be falsified falls outside the realm of science. In applying his ideas to the writing of history, Popper was particularly scathing about Marxist predictions of future historical development. But he did believe history could be written by looking at the situations in which historical figures found themselves and the problems they attempted to solve. Pentecostal historiography has been divided into four main types: the providential, the historical roots, the multicultural, and the functional. When each of these types is analyzed and judged against Popper’s strictures against induction, we find, among other things, that the unfashionable providential account need not be ruled out.