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The New Handbook of Second Language Acquisition is a thoroughly revised, re-organized, and re-worked edition of Ritchie and Bhatia's 1996 handbook. The work is divided into six parts, each devoted to a different aspect of the study of SLA. Part I includes a recent history of methods used in SLA research and an overview of currently used methods. Part II contains chapters on Universal Grammar, emergentism, variationism, information-processing, sociocultural, and cognitive-linguistic. Part III is devoted to overviews of SLA research on lexicon, morphosyntax, phonology, pragmatics, sentence processing, and the distinction between implicit and explicit knowledge. Part IV examines neuropsycholgy of SLA, another on child SLA, and the effects of age on second language acquisition and use. Part V is concerned with the contribution of the linguistic environment to SLA, including work on acquisition in different environments, through the Internet, and by deaf learners. Finally, Part VI treats social factors in SLA, including research on acquisition in contact circumstances, on social identity in SLA, on individual differences in SLA, and on the final state of SLA, bilingualism.
The New Handbook of Second Language Acquisition is a thoroughly revised, re-organized, and re-worked edition of Ritchie and Bhatia's 1996 handbook. The work is divided into six parts, each devoted to a different aspect of the study of SLA. Part I includes a recent history of methods used in SLA research and an overview of currently used methods. Part II contains chapters on Universal Grammar, emergentism, variationism, information-processing, sociocultural, and cognitive-linguistic. Part III is devoted to overviews of SLA research on lexicon, morphosyntax, phonology, pragmatics, sentence processing, and the distinction between implicit and explicit knowledge. Part IV examines neuropsychology of SLA, another on child SLA, and the effects of age on second language acquisition and use. Part V is concerned with the contribution of the linguistic environment to SLA, including work on acquisition in different environments, through the Internet, and by deaf learners. Finally, Part VI treats social factors in SLA, including research on acquisition in contact circumstances, on social identity in SLA, on individual differences in SLA, and on the final state of SLA, bilingualism.
This title was reviously published by Emerald under isbn 9781848552401.
What allows children to acquire language so effortlessly, with such speed, and with such amazing accuracy? Capitalizing on the most recent developments in linguistics and cognitive psychology, this volume sheds new light on the what, why, and how of the child's ability to acquire one or more languages. The "Handbook" is one of a kind in a number of respects. It includes state-of-the-art treatments of acquisition from a variety of theoretical viewpoints ranging from functionalist approaches and the implications of the creolization of languages for the study of acquisition to the relevance of Chomsky's Minimalist Program. It contains overviews of the acquisition of all components of linguistic structure, treats the acquisition of the sign languages of the deaf, and discusses the specific problems of bilingual acquisition. This handbook addresses the following questions: 'Is the capacity for language acquisition constant throughout the career of the language learner (that is, is it 'continuous') or does that capacity change in significant ways as the learner matures?' ; 'Is the language capacity a separate module of the mind or does it follow from general, 'all-purpose' cognitive capacities?'; 'What is innate in language acquisition and what is acquired on the basis of experience?'; 'What research/methodological issues arise in the study of child language acquisition?'; 'How might input from the language (or languages) of the environment, including visual/gestural input in the case of the sign languages of the deaf, affect the process and result of acquisition?'; and, 'How are the facts of non-normal acquisition to be explained?'
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As of 2020, Brill Research Perspectives in Multilingualism and Second Language Acquisition is no longer published as a journal by Brill, but will continue as a book series. Brill Research Perspectives in Multilingualism and Second Language Acquisition provides in-depth and authoritative surveys of key topics within these disciplines. The articles are written by leading scholars in the field who have been invited to contribute and not only give an overview of the field but also their own unique perspective on it. References are hyperlinked to the original sources where possible, giving scholars the opportunity to stay on stop of the literature or reading up on a subject quickly.

Brill Research Perspectives in Multilingualism and Second Language Acquisition publishes survey articles and position papers in the following subjects:

• Age (Maturation) and Aging (Attrition)
• Aphasia & Multilingualism
• Basic Research & Language Pedagogy
• Bilingualism/Multilingualism
• Child & Adult Second Language Acquisition
• Cognition & Consequences
• Forensics
• Individual Differences
• Language Contact
• Language Impairment
• Language Mixing & Hybrid Systems
• Language Processing (e.g. sentence & concept)
• Language Variation
• Learner types (e.g. Heritage; Non-Native)
• Literacy
• Mental Health
• Memory
• Motivation & Attitude
• Neurology & Neuropsychology
• Phonology , Morphology, Syntax; Pragmatics and SLA
• Research Methodology
• Sign Language
• Social Identity
• Social Media and Social Networks
• Theoretical Frameworks (e.g. Generative; Cognitive Linguistic; Emergentist; Information Processing; Sociolinguistic)
• Third Language Acquisition
• Thinking and Multilingual Competence