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This paper looks into the assessment methods in an undergraduate PBL course undertaken by first-year students in electrical and electronic engineering. The observation and data collection is performed by qualitative and quantitative research where seventy five portfolios were first observed and analysed. Portfolio is the main assessment task for this course and is worth 100% of the final grade. In addition, participants were asked to rank the effectiveness of a portfolio as an assessment tool in the PBL course. For maximum constructive alignment, the ranking is performed against each learning outcome of the course. The course has fifteen learning outcomes which are carefully designed to engage students with technical practice as well as social activities. Thirty eight participants responded to the questionnaire. All students involved have had at least one year of PBL experience.

In: Research on PBL Practice in Engineering Education

This paper looks into the assessment methods in an undergraduate PBL course undertaken by first-year students in electrical and electronic engineering. The observation and data collection is performed by qualitative and quantitative research where seventy five portfolios were first observed and analysed. Portfolio is the main assessment task for this course and is worth 100% of the final grade. In addition, participants were asked to rank the effectiveness of a portfolio as an assessment tool in the PBL course. For maximum constructive alignment, the ranking is performed against each learning outcome of the course. The course has fifteen learning outcomes which are carefully designed to engage students with technical practice as well as social activities. Thirty eight participants responded to the questionnaire. All students involved have had at least one year of PBL experience.

In: Research on PBL Practice in Engineering Education
Authors: and

This paper presents a qualitative study of immigrant Chinese teachers’ professional identity and beliefs about the teacher-student relationship in an intercultural context. Theoretically, this study takes its departure from a sociocultural perspective on understanding professional identity. The empirical analysis in the study drew mainly upon ethnographic interviews with a group of Chinese language teachers in Denmark concerning their life experiences, perceptions, and beliefs. The results of this study suggest that teachers’ beliefs about their roles as teachers and about student-teacher relationships are shaped by both their prior experiences and backgrounds and the current social and cultural contexts in which they are situated. Changes of context (e.g., from China to Denmark) often lead to a transformation of their professional identity and beliefs. Being a teacher in an intercultural context often exposes them to the confrontation of diverse challenges and dilemmas. On one hand, teachers in this study generally experienced a transformation from being a moral role model, subject expert, authority and parental role to being a learning facilitator and culture worker. On the other hand, they developed diverse individualized coping strategies to handle student-teacher interactions and other aspects of teachers’ professional identity.

In: Frontiers of Education in China
In: Teaching and Learning Culture
In: Teaching and Learning Culture
In: Project Approaches to Learning in Engineering Education
Volume Editors: , , and
The success of Problem Based Learning and Project Organised learning (PBL) as an educational method in the field of Higher Engineering Education is clear and beyond any doubt. An increasing number of Universities of Technology all over the world applies PBL in their curriculum. There are many sound arguments for changing to PBL, such as enhancing students’ motivation, integration of practice oriented competences, improved retention of students, augmenting the quality of education, collaboration with industry.
More and more educational research is supplying evidence to sustain these arguments. Engineers create innovations to improve the quality of our life. It just makes sense that the institutes of Higher Engineering Education want to know what educational innovations contribute to the quality of engineering education.
To promote research on PBL the UNESCO chair in Problem Based Learning in Engineering Education (UCPBL) organised the first Research Symposium on Problem Based Learning in Engineering and Science Education, June 30th-July 1st, 2008 at Aalborg University. This book contains a selection of papers from this research symposium, which have been reviewed and further developed.