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This collection of essays on the Byzantine culture of war in the period between the 4th and the 12th centuries offers a new critical approach to the study of warfare as a fundamental aspect of East Roman society and culture in Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages. The book’s main goal is to provide a critical overview of current research as well as new insights into the role of military organization as a distinct form of social power in one of history’s more long-lived empires. The various chapters consider the political, ideological, practical, institutional and organizational aspects of Byzantine warfare and place it at the centre of the study of social and cultural history.
Contributors are Salvatore Cosentino, Michael Grünbart, Savvas Kyriakidis, Tilemachos Lounghis, Christos Makrypoulias, Stamatina McGrath, Philip Rance, Paul Stephenson, Yannis Stouraitis, Denis Sullivan, and Georgios Theotokis.

Abstract

The current chapter presents a typology of forced migration of groups in the geopolitical sphere of the East Roman Empire in the period between 600 and 1204. To a large extent, mobility of people within or from outside-in the territories controlled by the Roman emperor of Constantinople was a consequence of war or state coercion. The former usually went along with an extensive rearrangement of boundaries of imperial authority as well as with the depopulation of regions within the imperial state, which were affected by enemy raids. The latter concerns the ways with which a medieval imperial state sought to make up for demographic losses and renew its basis of a reducing and taxpaying subject population.

In: Migration Histories of the Medieval Afroeurasian Transition Zone
In: A Companion to the Byzantine Culture of War, ca. 300-1204
In: A Companion to the Byzantine Culture of War, ca. 300-1204
In: A Companion to the Byzantine Culture of War, ca. 300-1204
In: A Companion to the Byzantine Culture of War, ca. 300-1204
In: A Companion to the Byzantine Culture of War, ca. 300-1204
In: A Companion to the Byzantine Culture of War, ca. 300-1204
The transition zone between Africa, Asia and Europe was the most important intersection of human mobility in the medieval period. The present volume for the first time systematically covers migration histories of the regions between the Mediterranean and Central Asia and between Eastern Europe and the Indian Ocean in the centuries from Late Antiquity up to the early modern era.
Within this framework, specialists from Byzantine, Islamic, Medieval and African history provide detailed analyses of specific regions and groups of migrants, both elites and non-elites as well as voluntary and involuntary. Thereby, also current debates of migration studies are enriched with a new dimension of deep historical time.

Contributors are: Alexander Beihammer, Lutz Berger, Florin Curta, Charalampos Gasparis, George Hatke, Dirk Hoerder, Johannes Koder, Johannes Preiser-Kapeller, Lucian Reinfandt, Youval Rotman, Yannis Stouraitis, Panayiotis Theodoropoulos, and Myriam Wissa.
In: Migration Histories of the Medieval Afroeurasian Transition Zone