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  • Author or Editor: Yonatan Glazer-Eytan x
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Abstract

One of the persistent concerns in the wake of the forced conversion of Spanish Jews to Christianity was the precise nature of their religiosity. Forcibly baptized between 1391 and the second decade of the fifteenth century, the newly converted as well as their descendants were believed to be only nominally Christians. They were reported to be secretly practicing Jewish rituals, mocking Christianity, and even dissimulating Catholic worship while inwardly intending to Judaize. This essay explores how the Inquisition established the heresy of Judaizing, with a particular attention to the ways in which inquisitors understood the relations between exterior acts and intentionality. It argues that the desire to secure conviction prompted inquisitors to coerce the accused to confess their heretical inner intentions. This produced another forced conversion, this time in the sense of the return of fallen baptized Christians to the fold of the Church. It also shaped the historical records we have on New Christian religiosity, and therefore calls for a reconsideration of how historians should approach it.

In: Forced Conversion in Christianity, Judaism and Islam

Abstract

The Hebrew inscription in the Piedat attributed to Bartolomé Bermejo is usually viewed in relation to the possible involvement of conversos in the painting. Offering a broader exploration of the local setting as well as the visual and textual models available to Bermejo, this article goes beyond a narrow converso interpretation and situates the inscription within two different contexts: an environment of growing Christian interest in Hebraic knowledge and an Aragonese artistic experimentation with the iconography of the Man of Sorrows.

In: Medieval Encounters
In: Forced Conversion in Christianity, Judaism and Islam
Coercion and Faith in Premodern Iberia and Beyond
Focusing on the Iberian Peninsula but examining related European and Mediterranean contexts as well, Forced Conversion in Christianity, Judaism and Islam traces how Christians, Jews, and Muslims grappled with the contradictory phenomenon of faith brought about by constraint and compulsion. Forced conversion brought into sharp relief the tensions among the accepted notion of faith as a voluntary act, the desire to maintain “pure” communities, and the universal truth claims of radical monotheism. Offering a comparative view of an important yet insufficiently studied phenomenon in the history of religions, this collection of essays explores the ways in which religion and violence reshaped these three religions and the ways we understand them today.

Abstract

The Hebrew inscription in the Piedat attributed to Bartolomé Bermejo is usually viewed in relation to the possible involvement of conversos in the painting. Offering a broader exploration of the local setting as well as the visual and textual models available to Bermejo, this article goes beyond a narrow converso interpretation and situates the inscription within two different contexts: an environment of growing Christian interest in Hebraic knowledge and an Aragonese artistic experimentation with the iconography of the Man of Sorrows.

In: Interreligious Encounters in Polemics between Christians, Jews, and Muslims in Iberia and Beyond

Abstract

The Hebrew inscription in the Piedat attributed to Bartolomé Bermejo is usually viewed in relation to the possible involvement of conversos in the painting. Offering a broader exploration of the local setting as well as the visual and textual models available to Bermejo, this article goes beyond a narrow converso interpretation and situates the inscription within two different contexts: an environment of growing Christian interest in Hebraic knowledge and an Aragonese artistic experimentation with the iconography of the Man of Sorrows.

In: Interreligious Encounters in Polemics between Christians, Jews, and Muslims in Iberia and Beyond