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Editors: Zvi Stampfer and Amir Ashur
The articles in this volume focus on the legal, linguistic, historical and literary roles of Jewish women in the Islamic world of the Middle Ages. Drawing heavily on manuscript evidence from the Cairo Genizah, the authors examine the challenges involved in the identification and interpretation of women’s letters from medieval Egypt, the registers of women’s written language, the relations between Jewish women and the Muslim legal system, the conversion of women, visions of women in Hell and gendered readings in the aggadic tradition of Judaism.
Author: Y. Zvi Stampfer

Abstract

This paper deals with passages from works by Muslim authors embedded within works of Jewish Law (Halakha) and biblical commentary; some passages are quoted verbatim, while others were reworked to fit the Jewish context by replacing references to the Qurʾān with references to the Jewish Bible. The Jewish works were written in Judeo-Arabic, making it easy to seamlessly adapt and integrate passages written in Arabic. Neither of the Jewish authors note that they are borrowing from earlier sources: sometimes one can recognize the embedded passage through a change in the linguistic register, but in other cases only familiarity with the borrowed texts can bring them to the reader’s attention. While scholars have noted this phenomenon in fields outside the Jewish legal context, such as philology and philosophy, it has not been recognized within judicial works. The sources discussed here survived only in the Cairo Genizah and have not previously been published.

In: Intellectual History of the Islamicate World