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Series:

Lawrence Kramer

Edited by Richard Leppert and Walter Bernhart

from London to Florence and Rome, in the belief that it is not her “fate” to “give up” her chances at life. Her doing so marks her as a modern woman in the later nineteenth century. Late in the twentieth, Jane Campion’s film version of James’s novel would take that modernity as its mainspring. The film

Series:

Lawrence Kramer

Edited by Richard Leppert and Walter Bernhart

wish to die, an irrepressible manifestation of a death drive very like the one Freud would name Thanatos a century later. She dies because of her belief that only her death can redeem Tannhäuser, a spiritual arithmetic not in the canon of any known church. In the event, Tannhäuser’s salvation consists

Series:

Lawrence Kramer

Edited by Richard Leppert and Walter Bernhart

…obtains our belief, even for what is singular and deviates from the ordinary course of nature. 10 Similarly, Coleridge claims that Shakespeare “darts himself forth, and passes into all the forms of human character and passion.” His characters are “at once true to nature, and fragments of the divine mind that

Series:

Prudence Gibson

, in 2008 the Swiss government made an amendment to acknowledge the moral rights of plants. Now, Switzerland’s law takes a biocentric position endorsing ‘the belief that all forms of life are equally valuable and that humanity is not the center of existence.’ 53 Ecuador also amended its constitution

Series:

Julian Meyrick

for economic resources. The immediate one is for legitimation. If Bourdieu does not share with economistic Marxism a belief in the base/superstructure divide, he certainly skirts with a ‘false consciousness’ view of cultural forms. The struggle for resources and legitimation, both means and end

Series:

Sandra Mayer

, and cultural belief systems with literary and artistic discourses that develop utopian erotic and aesthetic visions of individual transgression and agency” (2). The eponymous character’s transgressivity indeed made an enormous impression on fin-de-siècle commentators, as revealed, for example, by

Series:

Sandra Mayer

the dominant class” with a balanced programme mix of classical, intellectual, and boulevard drama (“Production of Belief” 86). The following remark by Raoul Auernheimer is illuminating with regard to the canonisation of Wilde’s society comedies and their use by a consumer-oriented theatre industry

Series:

Sandra Mayer

of modern media culture and bourgeois bigotry and double standards are ultimately rooted in his staunch belief in an essentially pure and uncorrupted language that must be cleansed from the manipulative influence of media discourse, Jelinek dismisses such confidence as entirely unsustainable (Pizer

Series:

David Skilton

at a readership who expect to be introduced into a world rather like the one they hope they live in, where people are motivated by complex moral and religious beliefs, and are conscious of a multiplicity of interpersonal relations set within a larger, more intimidating world. Actions and problems now

Series:

Kristen Nassif

depicted moment. Simply put, Michals confronts the accepted belief that photography is reality. Michals is well aware of what he calls a disability, especially when dealing with portraiture, which traditionally is believed to be able to convey an individual’s psychology—just think about the eyes seen as