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democratization. 42 In these developments, which ultimately resulted in the ‘rise of the West’ as a global power, the Protestant countries in North-western Europe took the lead, and were followed by the Roman-catholic South and later still by the Eastern Orthodox East. Although it is unlikely that religious

In: A History of Population Health

also discusses another remarkable feature of population health in Southern Europe: socioeconomic inequalities in mortality are smaller than elsewhere in Europe. 48 See Mackenbach et al., “Democratization” and Chapter 3. 49 See Misha Glenny, The Balkans, 1804–1999 (New York etc.: Viking Penguin, 2000

In: A History of Population Health

democratisation has evolved in the post-Soviet space. It could be described as a kind of almost ritualistic lamentation of the “oscillations”, “vagaries”, “obstructions” or (more radically expressed) “failure”, “collapse”, etc. of the so-called “democratic transition”, i.e., the transition from one

In: Europe Thirty Years After 1989
Author: Ladislav Cabada

evaluated as a generally successful story of socialisation into the Western structures, i.e. democratisation and Europeanisation, the next fifteen years are often evaluated as the period of getting sober. Many scholars, analysts, politicians and media-experts from West European countries, but also an

In: Europe Thirty Years After 1989

as crude a belief as the democratization with which Carlyle took issue. This also holds for us today, where the deification of the “leader,” not equality, holds sway. No Recipe for Heroes If we start out by acknowledging that hero worship is embedded in a need; that this need is quite universal

In: Cultural Criticism in the Netherlands, 1933-1940

persona, transposed to the present, tends to come across as an unqualified anachronism. Erasmus can be viewed as a harbinger of the principle of universal education, of the “democratization of the intellect,” and thus leaves the impression of someone who was quite content with a relatively superficial

In: Cultural Criticism in the Netherlands, 1933-1940

Poland’s Constitution of 3rd May (1791). The democratization of civic relationships, the liberalization of economic, political, and social bonds, the market economy, and individualism enhanced by the Protestant ethos of religious and moral values propelled the development of a new political doctrine of

In: Interpreting Globalization

1 Tasks of Research After 1991, Latvia continued the process of mnemonic activities of various “communities of memory” that began in the late 80-ies in the course of democratization and liberalization of the society. Based on the data of various sociological surveys, the authors of the

In: Europe Thirty Years After 1989

cultural attendance. Today, the belief is consolidating that culture and cultural practices should be democratized and universally accessible. Given this, cultural institutions are launching several initiatives framed as projects in artistic or cultural education. At the same time, we can witness a return

In: Interpreting Globalization

ago scholars came to discover diverging developments in post-Communist Europe, an increasing gap between the democratized or democratizing part of Europe and another increasingly authoritarian one. Moreover authors were pointing to “democratic fatigue” and already warning about the possibility of

In: Europe Thirty Years After 1989