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Benjamin B. Olshin

enlightenment that can be approached—if only asymptotically. In turn, of course, Western theology and Platonic philosophy both have clear absolutes, the fixed referents of the Divine or the Platonic Forms. So, we are left to ponder: 1. Are there absolutes or just absolute beliefs ? 2. If we

Series:

Melanie Barbato

up with the transmission of beliefs and practices, from individual to individual, between communities, across time and across cultures. Seen in this light, a religion may be aptly described as “a sort of ‘system’ that retains and transmits information” in various encoded, symbolic forms (Babb, 1995

Series:

Melanie Barbato

can be used as part of complex philosophical debate, for many Jains these teachings boil down to a simple set of beliefs that includes respect for other views and non-violent interaction with others who are on the search for truth. The Historical Development of Anekāntavāda To provide a general

Jain Approaches to Plurality

Identity as Dialogue

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Melanie Barbato

In Jain Approaches to Plurality Melanie Barbato offers a new perspective on the Jain teaching of plurality ( anekāntavāda) and how it allowed Jains to engage with other discourses from Indian inter-school philosophy to global interreligious dialogue. Jainism, one of the world’s oldest religions, has managed to both adapt and preserve its identity across time through its inherently dialogical outlook. Drawing on a wide range of textual sources and original research in India, Barbato analyses the encounters between Jains and non-Jains in the classical, colonial and global context. Jain Approaches to Plurality offers a comprehensive introduction to anekāntavāda as a non-Western resource for understanding plurality and engaging in dialogue.

“Building upon earlier work in this field without simply reduplicating it, Melanie Barbato’s work delves deeply into the question of the relevance of Jain approaches to religious and philosophical diversity to contemporary issues of inter-religious dialogue, and dialogues across worldviews more generally. (…) This work is a most welcome contribution to the conversation.”

— Jeffery D. Long, Professor of Religion and Asian Studies, Elizabethtown College. April 2017. Author of Jainism: An Introduction.

Series:

Benjamin B. Olshin

. Like the later works of Harris, Mondrian’s later paintings can be seen as serving as the “place of enlightenment” where reality is glimpsed clearly right there in the act of engaging with the painting itself. 31 Such efforts may seem quaint to us in this pragmatic age, and a belief in Theosophy

Series:

Benjamin B. Olshin

the physicist and writer Paul Davies comments: Clearly, then, both religion and science are founded on faith—namely, on belief in the existence of something outside the universe, like an unexplained God or an unexplained set of physical laws, maybe even a huge ensemble of unseen universes, too. For

Series:

Melanie Barbato

the human life span: while in the first age people live up to a mythological age, in the last age life expectancy will decline to only ten years. Currently the world is in the second last stage of one such cycle. According to Jain belief, during each cycle the teachings of Jainism will be propagated

Series:

Benjamin B. Olshin

relationship” more generally comes from the fact that the project of philosophy and the project of physics are not actually the same, as pointed out above. In dealing with the natural sciences, Pylkkänen is also critiquing the belief that we should be able to use the methods of physics, for example, to talk

Series:

Fabian Völker

: „ Prapañca then is the activity of consciousness that leads us to the belief that we are isolated beings at large in an extended world of plurality. […]. In other words, because of prapañca categories such as self, other, being, non-being, nirvāṇa , saṃsāra , subject, object, etc. arise.“ Harris, Ian

Series:

Melanie Barbato

, which was developed during the enlightenment period, based on the historically contingent separation of faith and reason. In Indian culture, the intelligent mind never had to distance itself from religious belief. The acceptance of religious pluralism in India has therefore to be examined in another